WoodSkills Issue 02 - Page 36

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WS: To date, what has been the most rewarding experience involving your furniture and being a furniture designer + maker?

CT: Probably the fact that I’ve somehow been able to make ends meet and keep our bills paid for 18 years with just my furniture work, hopefully that will continue well into the future.

WS: What advice would you give to someone who is aspiring to become a woodworker and furniture designer?

CT: That’s a tough question. I have always partially regretted being self taught, I think things might have been easier had I gone to a furniture making school like College of the Redwoods or North Bennet Street. Then again, I might be doing something completely different had I done that. I would suggest that taking classes from someone skilled in the thing you want to learn is a great way to jump start your progress in any field. It’s even more beneficial if you can take a class in that person’s shop and get a feel for how they run a business. In the end it takes time and effort to get good at anything and you’ve got to be willing to work hard to get to the place you want to be, it won’t happen overnight but it will eventually if you work hard and stay focused on whatever goal you decide to set for yourself.

WS: What are you currently working on that you would like to mention?

CT: I’m working on another puzzle/mechanical cabinet that spins 360 degrees and has a variety of different mechanical locks and puzzle mechanisms that open and close as the cabinet rotates. Hopefully one more in a long line of this type of piece.

PUZZLE CABINET (Detail) , 2014 ETIMOE, AMBOYNA BURL, CURLY SYCAMORE, MAPLE BURL, EBONY, MARQUETRY WOODS 34" H x 42"W x 18" D

Craig Thibodeau San Diego, CA USA

Photo by Craig Carlson