WoodSkills Issue 02 - Page 32

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WS: What attracted you to the Art Deco style of furniture?

CT: Probably the complexity, Art Deco furniture involves highly complex veneering and inlay and demands a tremendous amount of skill and patience from the maker. Some of the more elaborate Art Deco furniture designs from the 1920’s might take hundreds of hours of labor to create and I find the challenge intriguing.

WS: What inspired you to begin incorporating marquetry and parquetry in your furniture designs? In a few words, can you describe both these techniques?

CT: Seeing the work of marquetry master Paul Schurch at a number of shows inspired me to contact him to take one of his classes in marquetry, luckily he was still teaching marquetry in his shop and I was able to take a week long class from him and learn the fundamentals of marquetry which really jump started my marquetry career. The parquetry work I do came from the need to fulfill a client commission, I taught myself how to do parquetry because of a large commission years ago that incorporated a variety of parquetry decoration.

WS: Your marquetry process involves the Boulle method. Were you self-taught in this traditional 18th century Boulle method? Did you attend formal training to learn this method? Can you enlighten us to the background of this method?

CT: Turns out I forgot to change this info on my website, I actually use the packet method which differs from the Boulle method. The packet method involves cutting all the various layers of the image at once and is a technique I learned from Paul Schurch when I took my first marquetry class from him in 2005.

OAK LEAF MARQUETRY (DETAIL) CURLY MAPLE, WENGE, VARIOUS MARQUETRY WOODS Craig Thibodeau San Diego, CA USA

Photo by Craig Carlson