Wildcat Connection August 2017 - Page 24

T

here once was a boy who won some ribbons of blue, came home from the fair with a big trophy, too.

With a voice glad and proud he said to his Dad,

"Tis the very best year that I've ever had."

Said his very wise Dad, "Son, I'd like to hear,

why you think that this was such a fine year."

"Why, Dad, you well know all the prizes I've won,

how I've come out on top in most things I've done.

Just look at the ribbons, that hang on my wall,

and thing of the money I've made since last fall

from premium checks and a big auction price.

You can't help but think cash and ribbons are nice,"

But the man said, "My son, you're not thinking right.

Blue ribbons, 'tis true are better than white.

But ribbons will fade and trophies grow old.

Money's soon spent and fame soon grows cold.

The important things, son, are not ribbons or pins,

and sometimes, it's really the loser who wins.

Now here are the things, most important, it's true,

your 4-H experience has accomplished for you.

You've seen how a business meeting is run,

This knowledge will help you in years to come.

You've conquered the fear of addressing a crowd.

You've learned how to stand up and talk nice and loud.

Patience you've learned in your projects, too,

as well as some skills that will always help you.

You've learned the fine feeling it gives to lend

a glad helping hand to stranger or friend.

You've learned to cooperate with majority rule...

to give in with grace and not be the fool,

who always must have his very own way,

be it in club work, in school or at play.

You’ve learned how to lose without making a ‘beef.’

You know the judge judges to his best belief.

You’ve learned how to win without boasting too loud.

A kid can lose friends If he’s overly proud.

Those are the things most important to you.

You’ll remember and use them All your life through.

They’ll help you become a might fine man.

They’ll do more for you than a prize ever can.”

(Poem attributed to Esther Chandler, Lakeside 4-H Club, San Diego County, Calif.)

Brian Swisher

4-H Youth

Development

A 4-H Fable