Wild Northerner Magazine Summer 2018 - Page 87

Lalonde has been all over the country and world fishing for species of all kinds. He has sought trout in southern B.C. and Northern Quebec. He has fished in parts of the United States. He has also spent a lot of time in South America. He has gone after big fish in the Caribbean, Jamaica, Costa Rico and Nicaragua to name a few places.

“I don’t go to these places for a vacation,” Lalonde said. “I don’t go a sit and relax. I go and fish. I’ve caught tuna and rooster fish. You never know what you will get down there. I’m still chasing a marlin and sailfish. I’ve seen other people catch them and I haven’t got one yet. It’s something I want to hook into and fight.”

Out of all the places he has been, Lalonde holds fishing tributaries for speckled trout on James Bay as the one which gets his blood boiling the fastest and the most.

“There is nothing like it,” Lalonde said. “It’s big numbers and big fish. Over and over again in every riff. It is once-in-a-life-time kind of fishing.”

Lalonde takes his birthplace and his home stomping grounds seriously and to heart. He is like so many others who live and make a life in the northern Ontario region – he loves it and he isn’t living anywhere else for any reason. Lalonde did this interview over the phone while reveling in the fact he was sitting on a dock on a lake 14-kilometres long with no one in sight. Just him and wilderness.

“I’m glad I (bleeping) live here,” Lalonde said. “I’ve lived in B.C. and southern Ontario. I’m happy I didn’t get a job somewhere else and got stuck there. I am home. We are all lucky to live here and have what we have.”

Lalonde has been all over the country and world fishing for species of all kinds. He has sought trout in southern B.C. and Northern Quebec. He has fished in parts of the United States. He has also spent a lot of time in South America. He has gone after big fish in the Caribbean, Jamaica, Costa Rico and Nicaragua to name a few places.

“I don’t go to these places for a vacation,” Lalonde said. “I don’t go a sit and relax. I go and fish. I’ve caught tuna and rooster fish. You never know what you will get down there. I’m still chasing a marlin and sailfish. I’ve seen other people catch them and I haven’t got one yet. It’s something I want to hook into and fight.”

Out of all the places he has been, Lalonde holds fishing tributaries for speckled trout on James Bay as the one which gets his blood boiling the fastest and the most.

“There is nothing like it,” Lalonde said. “It’s big numbers and big fish. Over and over again in every riff. It is once-in-a-life-time kind of fishing.”

Lalonde takes his birthplace and his home stomping grounds seriously and to heart. He is like so many others who live and make a life in the northern Ontario region – he loves it and he isn’t living anywhere else for any reason. Lalonde did this interview over the phone while reveling in the fact he was sitting on a dock on a lake 14-kilometres long with no one in sight. Just him and wilderness.

“I’m glad I (bleeping) live here,” Lalonde said. “I’ve lived in B.C. and southern Ontario. I’m happy I didn’t get a job somewhere else and got stuck there. I am home. We are all lucky to live here and have what we have.”