Trunkline Magazine (Louisville Zoo) Trunkline Magazine: September 2016 - Page 13

Left photos, Joel Sartore‘s National Geographic photos. Below: Example of Colobus monkey coming to the Louisville Zoo next year. the pair for his Photo Ark project. The goal of Sartore’s Photo Ark project was to show the world what is at stake for so many endangered species and to inspire people to save them while there’s still time. “These animals are beautiful; they are intelligent and they deserve the right to exist,” Sartore told us. So what does retirement for our woolly monkeys mean? It means they are living a life of leisure in special behind-the-scenes areas near the giraffe exhibit, enjoying a calm and quiet atmosphere with personalized attention from keepers. Lead keeper and an expert on this species, Silvia Zirkelbach, says they have acclimated extremely well. The new location of their indoor and outdoor habitats allows the monkeys closer proximity to their keepers who now have even more time to pamper the monkeys as they nosh on fruit, veggies, seeds, nuts, cereal and of course, bugs. The woolly monkeys join the league of animals at the Zoo that have comfortably retired from the public eye. You can look forward to seeing a new African primate exhibit featuring beautiful black-and-white colobus monkeys native to equatorial Africa. For the latest and greatest on this upcoming project, visit louisvillezoo.org/leadershipcampaign. And if you’re feeling lonely that our woollies have retired — just Inside your zoo In the near future, your Zoo will begin renovations for a new colobus monkey exhibit near the African Outpost. This addition is part of our new master plan and current leadership capital campaign. Learn about our plans to bring you more nose-tonose encounters that will amaze and engage by visiting louisvillezoo.org/ leadershipcampaign. take a train ride! The train passes near the backside of the giraffe house; with a little bit of luck and some very sharp eyesight, you may just see two fuzzy woolly monkeys enjoying a relaxing retirement. Louisville Zoo Trunkline • Fall 2016 • 13 Left photos, Joel Sartore‘s National Geographic photos. Below: Example of Colobus monkey coming to the Louisville Zoo next year. Inside your zoo the pair for his Photo Ark project. The goal of Sartore’s Photo Ark project was to show the world what is at stake for so many endangered species and to inspire people to save them while there’s still time. “These animals are beautiful; they are intelligent and they deserve the right to exist,” Sartore told us. So what does retirement for our woolly monkeys mean? It means they are living a life of leisure in special behind-the-scenes areas near the giraffe exhibit, enjoying a calm and quiet atmosphere with personalized attention from keepers. Lead keeper and an expert on this species, Silvia Zirkelbach, says they have acclimated extremely well. The new location of their indoor and outdoor habitats allows the monkeys closer proximity to their keepers who now have even more time to pamper the monkeys as they nosh on fruit, veggies, seeds, nuts, cereal and of course, bug ˈHH[ۚ^\š[HXYYHو[[X[]B]]HYܝXH]\YHHXX^YK[H[ܝ\YZ[H]YX[[X]H^X]X]\[X]]Y[XX[ ]]B؝\[ۚ^\]]H\]X]ܚX[YXK܈H]\[ܙX]\ۈ\\Z[ڙX \]Z\ݚ[^˛ܙXY\\[\ZYۋ[Y[x&\HY[[ۙ[H]\Y\]H]\Y8%\[HX\]\K[\[Y[[ݘ][ۜ™܈H]؝\›[ۚ^B^X]X\HYX[] \Y][ۂ\\و\]X\\[[\[XY\\\][[\ZYۋX\X]\[˜[[H[ܙHK]ۛH[[\][[X^H[[YHB\][Z\ݚ[^˛ܙ›XY\\[\ZYۋZHHZ[YHHHZ[\\›X\HXYHوH\YB\N]H]H]وX[YH\H\^Y\Y [HX^B\YH^HH[ۚ^\™[Z[H[^[]\[Y[ Z\ݚ[H[[H8([ M8( L‚