Thunder Roads La/MS November TRLAMS_NOVW - Page 33

EWS BYTES Signed by Governor Jerry Brown on October 3, 2017, SB 672 specifies that “Upon the first placement of a traffic-actuated signal or replacement of the loop detector of a traffic-actuated signal [responding to the presence of traffic detected by mechanical, visual, electrical, or other means], the traffic-actuated signal shall, to the extent feasible and in conformance with professional traffic engineering practice, be installed and maintained so as to detect lawful bicycle or motorcycle traffic on the roadway.” Advanced by ABATE of California, the motorcycle rights organization says of the legislation; “Thanks to Governor Brown for signing this permanent extension,” stated Chairman of the Board Glenn Phillips, adding that “With over a Million Motorcyclists in our state, this legislation is imperative to protect riders on California roads.” NEW YORK MEASURE WOULD BAN CHILDREN FROM RIDING Assembly Bill 8700 would prohibit children under the age of twelve from riding on a motorcycle. Introduced by Assemblymember Aileen M. Gunther (D-Dist.100), the bill states; “No person shall operate or ride a motorcycle on a public highway, road or street in this state with a child under the age of twelve on such motorcycle.” A8700 has been referred to the Assembly Transportation Committee. HELP “LEMON LAW” PASS FOR RIDERS IN PENNSYLVANIA ABATE of Pennsylvania has issued a Legislative Call To Action regarding House Bill 74, a bill introduced by Representative Pam Snyder that would include motorcycles in the current PA Automobile Lemon Law. HB 74 was introduced and referred to the House Consumer Affairs Committee. On June 12 the House Consumer Affairs Committee approved HB 74, and the measure is now facing consideration by the full House. “Contact House of Representative members and ask them to support HB 74 to include motorcycles in the state’s “Automobile Lemon Law,” urges the state office of ABATE of PA. “You can call them, email them or visit them. But you have to do something if we are to have success in having HB 74 pass the House and be sent to the Senate for their consideration.” MOTORCYCLE THEFTS ARE ON THE RISE The annual theft report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau shows bike thefts rose 2% nationally across the U.S. in 2016, with a total of 46,467 motorcycles were reported stolen, up from 45,555 in 2015. For the second year in a row, California is the top state for stolen bikes, where 7,506 motorcycles were reported taken -- compared with 4,482 stolen in Florida and 3,692 in Texas, the next most troublesome territories. Vermont had only 24 motorcycle thefts in 2016, the least amount of all the states. New York was the most-plagued city, followed by San Diego, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, while Los Angeles County was the top county. The NICB study reveals that the bulk of motorcycle thefts predictably occur during the summer months, when more bikes are on the street. August was the top month, when almost twice as many motorcycles disappeared than in December or January. Some bikes are more popular targets than others or are simply easier to steal, and a disproportionate number are Japanese models top the theft list: Honda (9052 thefts), Yamaha (7,723), Suzuki (6,229), Kawasaki (5,221), Harley-Davidson (4,963). The recovery rate for stolen bikes isn’t encouraging, according to the NICB report, with only 17,463 of the 46,467 motorcycles reported stolen in 2016 being returned to their owners, about a 40% nationwide rate of recovery. The recovery rate in Hawaii was highest at 94%, while the New York rate, at 19%, was the lowest in the nation. By brand, Honda owners had about twice as good a chance of getting their bikes back than owners of Ducatis, which had only a 29% chance of coming home. On a more positive note, bike thievery is down considerably -- about 30% -- from what it was a decade ago. PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT SEEKS STRICT HELMET LAW ENFORCEMENT The Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) in the Philippines is seeking to strengthen enforcement of the Mandatory Helmet Law (RA 10054) nationwide. In a Memorandum issued Sept 6 to all governors, mayors and others, the DILG directs local officials “to implement said (Helmet Law) Act, and ensure that the provisions are strictly complied with.” Congressman Cesar V. Sarmiento directly addressed DILG during the department’s budget hearing in Congress and said he observed that several motorbike riders and drivers forget to use their helmet resulting in road accidents and deaths. The Subject of the memo calls for the “Observan ce of the provisions of Republic Act No. 10054; an Act Mandating All Motorcycle Riders to Wear Standard Protective Motorcycle Helmets While Driving and Providing Penalties Therefor (sic).” QUOTABLE QUOTE: “A man wearing a helmet defending our country is more valuable than a man in a helmet defending a football.” ~ Seen on a T-Shirt www.thunderroadslams.com | November 2017 | Thunder Roads Magazine Louisiana/Mississippi 31