The World Explored, the World Suffered Education Issue Nr. 19 June 2019 - Page 22

the Platonic question of the value of life. The 4 questions are "What can I know?, What ought I to do? , What can I hope for?, and What is man?" His answers to two of these questions that one ought to do what is right and if one does so one can hope for a flourishing life raise the question that Aristotle sought to answer, namely "What is the flourishing life?" Aristotle's answer was the contemplative life but he must have had in mind the answer of the Delphic oracle to this same question which referred to "taking on the colour of the dead". Smith avoids according religion a prominent position in his reflections on bios politikos and thus avoids Aristotle's answer to the question of the value of a flourishing life. He does, however, in his 25th ad final lecture return to Aristotle's Ethics and asks whether "patriotism" might be a virtue located on a continuum of excess and deficiency the one pole of which would be nationalism and the other pole Kantian Cosmopolitanism: a strange ending given the almost complete absence of Kantian reflections in the rest of his lectures. Smith points out that an important consequence of Cosmopolitanism is that there is no significant difference between human beings because their humanity is the primary normative characteristic of their being. He goes on to suggest: "This is the Cosmopolitan ethics of humanity which could only hold true of a confederation of Republics overseen or ruled by international law-- a league of nations." Smith Pursues his Aristotelian discussion of whether patriotism could be a virtue with Carl Smitt's reflections from "The Concept of the Political" in which it is claimed that bios politikos is the antagonistic life a dangerous animal leads. This antagonistic life is founded upon a Plemarchean theory of justice which claims that one ought to do good to one's friends inside the polis and harm to one's enemies outside the polis. Smith comments upon this in the following manner: "The political life contains the most intense and extreme antagonism. Friend and enemy are the inescapable categories through which we experience the political: Athens versus Sparta. All attempts to rights, free trade etc are attempts to avoid the above fact." Smith points out that the "Friend-enemy" schema would be self-contradictory because if it also operated on the domestic front we would be dealing with a divided city. He then goes on to criticize the Kantian position: "Kant confuses politics with morality. Kant wishes to transcend the sovereign state with known international rules of justice. If Schmitt believed man to be the dangerous animal Kant believed him to be the rule-following animal. Kant's desire to transcend the state with a kind of international future is both naive and anti-political. If Hobbes was right when he said that covenants without a sword are but words, then on Kant's view the question becomes, who would enforce