The Trial Lawyer Fall 2017 - Page 95

CIVIL RIGHTS CIVIL RIGHTS Across 1. The 1948 landmark case of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ v. (See 61 Across) ruled that restrictions barring persons from ownership of realty on the basis of race or color violate the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amend- ment. 8. Civil rights organization. 13. Female whose numbers are increasing. 14. A successful challenge to a state-supported school’s “women only” admission policy was announced by the High Court in Mississippi Uni- versity for Women v. _ _ _ _ _, 458 U.S. 718 (1982). 15. Regional Response Team (Abbr). 16. First person possessive. 17. Slang for detective. 18. Plural existence. 19. Spanish Article. 20. Battle ground for sexual equality. 22. Monetary unit of Rumania. 23. Texas town that provided a showdown for right-to-privacy extrem- ists. 24. Chestnut sprinkled with gray or white. 26. Prefix meaning to cover or surround. 27. Two opposite directions (Abbr). 28. Exercise a most important civil right. 31. In the 50s and 60s _ _ _ _ - Americans did more to advance the cause for individual and civil rights than any other segment of the population. 33. Engage in discriminatory conduct. 36. Bugler (Abbr). 38. The “separate but equal” doctrine as stated in Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), was one, according to Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954). 39. Director General (Abbr). 41. Uranium (Chemical symbol). 42. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (Environmental law acronym). 45. Jurisdiction. 46. Computer memory in which program instructions are permanently stored. 48. Lighted (Archaic). 51. Public relations. 52. Media by which much of the population obtains its political and legal information (Slang). 53. Blood type or tax schedule, take your pick. 54. International Host (Abbr). 55. Opposed. 56. Dining room, decorated with columns. 58. Prosecution opposition. 60. Belonging to New York’s police department (Abbr). 61. The second name appearing in the title of the landmark civil rights case referred to in 1 Across. Down 1. State police who use excessive force and violate a prisoner’s civil rights can be criminally prosecuted, according to the 1955 landmark case _ _ _ _ _ _ v. United States, 325 U.S. 91. 2. Appoi