The TRADE 56 - Page 3

[ E D I T O R I A L ] THETRADE thetradenews.com  Editor JOHN BRAZIER +44 (0) 20 7397 3808 john.brazier@thetradenews.com Senior Reporter HAYLEY MCDOWELL +44 (0) 20 7397 3821 hayley.mcdowell@thetradenews.com Contributors JOE PARSONS, SARFRAZ THIND, DAVID WHITEHOUSE Advertising Director MARC CAROLISSEN +44 (0) 20 7397 3807 marc.carolissen@thetradenews.com Senior Account Manager MATT ALDRED +44 (0) 20 3478 1061 matt.aldred@globalcustodian.com Research & Operations KAREN DELAHOY +44 (0) 20 7397 3826 karen.delahoy@thetradenews.com Art Director OLIVIA ROSZKOWSKA +44 (0) 20 3478 1053 olivia.roszkowska@globalcustodian.com Publisher JONATHAN WATKINS +44 (0) 20 7397 3815 jonathan.watkins@thetradenews.com Tungsten Publishing 20 Little Britain London, UK EC1A 7DH +44 (0) 20 7397 3800 © The Trade is owned and produced by Tungsten Publishing Ltd. ©Tungsten Publishing 2018 Although Tungsten Publishing has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this publication, neither it nor any contributor can accept any legal responsibility whatsoever for consequences that may arise from errors or omissions or any opinions or advice given. This publication is not a substitute for professional advice on a specific transaction. No reproduction allowed without prior permission. Taking the global stage A s I write this welcoming note on a gloriously sunny London day in June we are in the midst of World Cup fever. While the Olympic Games are more often referred to as the highest pinnacle professional athletes can aspire to, for footballers it doesn’t come any bigger than this. While the early group-stage games may not exactly live up to the tag – and England will most likely bow out in disappointing fashion (prove me wrong lads!) – the tournament never fails to bring people from all over the globe together in enthused celebration. My own memories of past World Cups may not extend beyond some hazy recollections of Roberto Baggio’s crucial penalty miss during the final of the 1994 tournament that handed Brazil their fourth World Cup triumph, more recent editions have provided some truly memorable moments from the countries where The TRADE is most widely distributed to. From the USMNT’s (the US for anyone unfamiliar) matching England and then going further in the 2014 tournament, to one of the game’s great- est ever players, Zinedine Zindane, following up a historic performance in 1998 by ending his illustrious career with a red card in the 2006 final against Italy. Germany have been the most recent success story, bringing home the trophy from the last tournament in South Africa, while Spain also triumphed over the rest of the world in 2010 with a late, late winner against the Netherlands. Ultimately, it’s moments like these, for better or worse, that make these tournaments so very special to people around the world. Being British, big ticket sporting events are usually intrinsically linked to frustration and dis- appointment, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy the spectacle all the same. As the world grapples with new problems every other day, it’s opportu- nities to celebrate on a global scale that should serve to remind us what’s important: Winning a game of football and getting a shiny trophy. Another force that has been taking the world by storm recently – tenu- ous link ahoy – is cryptocurrency. Every time I speak to someone in the industry I always like to gauge their personal interest in this space, because let’s face it, sooner or later institutional firms are going to get on board with crypto. That’s why we have recently launched The TRADE Crypto, a new dedi- cated website for all of our expanding cryptocurrency coverage, which will include news, editorials, thought leadership articles, video interviews with crypto participants and more. Whether you’ve a personal interest (read: investment) in the crypto space or are just keeping your finger on the pulse until one of the big names dips a toe into the waters, www.thetradenewscrypto.com is the best place to do so. John Brazier Editor The TRADE Issue 56 // TheTradeNews.com // 3