the torch Spring 2015, Issue 1 - Page 23

“I am deeply committed to Baylor and am trying to find meaningful ways to give back to the organization, especially by expanding the arts in medicine programming that will support the recovery and renewal of patients and caregivers.” – Bonnie Pitman joined the medical staff. He is a miracle worker, and I cannot say enough positive things about Dr. Rosenblatt and the superb care I have received. Over the years at Baylor I have met many physicians, nurses and technicians who all share a deep commitment to caring for their patients. The focus on patient care is extraordinary at Baylor; it’s one of the great hallmarks of the organization. I am deeply committed to Baylor and am trying to find meaningful ways to give back to the organization, especially by expanding the arts in medicine programming that will support the recovery and renewal of patients and caregivers. How are you involved in Baylor’s arts and healing programs? A few years ago, Edward Agura, M.D., medical director of bone and marrow transplant at Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, introduced me to Pam Carnevale, director of the Virginia R. Cvetko Patient Education and Support, and we have been developing ideas and projects to expand the use of the arts in medicine, including, continuing art therapy, resources for artists and creating healing, positive environments for patients in the hospital. There is so much evidence that art can make a huge difference in recovery and healing by reducing stress and providing other positive motivators for patients who have long-term illnesses. Baylor already has a wonderful music program, and Pam and I have been working to develop programs in the area of visual arts for patients and families. What inspires you? Connecting people with the arts to foster their creative spirit a nd hea ling a nd being compassionate inspires me. After retiring from the DMA and while recovering from a respiratory infection, I was at a crossroads and looking for a new way to experience the world around me. I developed a practice that would support my passions in life – “Do Something New Every Day.” It is a way to look at the world around you and make an ordinary day extraordinary. I have been committed to this practice for more than 1,335 consecutive days. It has led me to meet new people, have new adventures and fully attend to activities in my life that fill me with joy. Through the Cvetko Center I have been able to share the “Do Something New” practice with cancer and transplant support groups. What are the most important lessons you’ve learned through your effort to “Do Something New Every Day”? I have learned a great deal through this practice, especially to be compassionate with myself and with others and to be grateful for simple things. I try to acknowledge with gratitude all that I have, especially the wonderful people who support and care for me. Other important lessons have been: do things that give you joy, be kind to yourself and others, nourish relationships, listen to your body and be playful. My “Do Something New” practice has a strong focus on the arts, as it is one of my passions. The workshops at Baylor have opened new worlds to me as I have met patients and caregivers with chronic illnesses who are seeking ideas for positive ways of looking at all life has to offer by doing something new each day! For more information about the Virginia R. Cvetko Patient Education Center and other cancer initiatives at Baylor, contact Tim Moore at 214.820.7877 or Timothy.Moore@BaylorHealth.edu. 23