The Linnet's Wings Blackbird Dock - Page 82

              No dice pal. Try someone else. It had been a tough, tough descent and the remainder ahead  uncertain. Nevertheless, No to you, thanks all the same.                After half an hour of hanging uselessly at stalemate we decided for the main road again. At one  shady spot nada another half­hour. Signs of the usual early and rapid dusk on the Equator. We tried  further around the next corner where the side­arterial might bring something.               A slight, barely perceptible sense of the girl fading. Wilting was she just a tiny smidgeon?  Raising the possibility of a cab confirmed. An hour earlier Susie had been told we would catch a cab if  need be, hail the first we saw. There had been none before Pakem; or one in the wrong direction while  Suze was being ridden down. The possibility of calling for a cab on these mountain sides had never  entered the head.               — You can call for a cab here?... (Mundane modernity had been hermetically sealed off on this  journey.)               An ankot traveling at first in the other direction got us out of the woods. The driver had been  signed for where we were headed. A short while later, like a mirage in the desert, here was the blue van  coming on, a replica of the first complete with the same improvised weld ing for the passenger door. Late  afternoon bench­seat an easier prospect. The man would take us as far as UGM, where we had caught  the first ankot. Supper rose up in the imaginary, Suze wanting "everything" on the plate.               First though another prayer. We had heard the maghrib echoing a number of times along the  stretch, in the usual way emanating as if from underground. Driver knew where there was a mosque. He  dropped us out front of Al-Hassanah, where it seemed Susie might not have been before. There was no  need for ablutions, Susie advised, as they had been performed at the museum.               Within the walls in a corner of the vacant hall at Al-Hassanah an older woman sat across a small  table from a fresh­faced man perhaps in his late twenties. She was his guru, the chap revealed. Much  conversation while Susie was gone.               Yes, an informal spiritual guide; it was common in the Muslim world, a kind of mentoring of the  younger generation. The youth sought it out.               A smiling gap­toothed scarved woman of the traditional sort with much less English than she  had given indication during the preliminaries. Possibly she was illiterate; or only functionally literate. On  the other hand perhaps her literacy extended only as far as the Qur'an. From her manner one did  receive a strong impression of strength of mind.               A covered cup of tea was presented to Guest. Not a Muslim, no, but a friend to the Muslims and  good people everywhere. The introduction was a success.               The pair had Bosnia­Herzegovina somewhere in the mental frame—the usual recourse in the  Malay world for detailing background and roots. Almost certainly the young man was in good hands  here. But where was the pair themselves from?... Orang Jogja?...               Here was Suze, all done, a quick prayer. Out on the road shortly after for the Transjogja that  would deliver us to a dining place, Susie explained that after a prayer she was always fully restored,  hardship and trouble all past. The weariness of that long day's trudge the same.               But Suze, where was this woman from would you say then?....               That morning after turning out of the gang on the first leg of our way Susie was brought to a halt  before one of the big beefy becak drivers waiting beside the rail­line. Some days prior in answer to a  question Susie had affirmed that she could instantly tell a fellow islander, a fellow Madurese. How  Susie?... Well, by the accent; otherwise by manner and clothing. Certainly. The girl had no doubt.               The year before Susie might have in fact been told about this becak driver. Instantly she picked  the man as one of her own. Mustachioed, tubby, strong­voiced. There could not have been anything in  the soiled, drab clothing. The pair did enjoy the new acquaintance. 82