The Linnet's Wings Blackbird Dock - Page 81

hand Susie extended for indication of direction.               A few times heading down Susie skipped along to catch a remark; at a couple of places the  young woman picked grass switches. Back at the losmen there  had been a suggestion her bag might have been a bit  overloaded for the day ahead.               The transport was taking its time. We walked against  the traffic on the right, two­way undivided road with narrow  single lanes. On the bends Susie was warned to come off the  shoulder; often there was a foot of grass verge beside a  channel.               A curious pair; children's eyes particularly stared. A  picture of husband and wife. (In her cover Susie could have  passed for more senior years.) We alarmed some ducks with  what must have been inauthentic Javanese quackery.  Chickens and roosters strayed onto the grassy verge and  motorists and riders occasionally honked and passed  greetings. The first offer of rest Susie rebuffed; she was made of sterner stuff. Second after perhaps an hour and  half from the museum accepted. A safe, shady spot and comfortable grass matting. Ten minutes was  enough for Susie.               After another hour a chap carrying a parang who had come out from his paddy suggested  Pakem was another tiga jam on.               — Tiga jam? Tiga jam!... Three hours.               Second stop; perhaps four o'clock. The phone was in the bag and asking Susie was best left  off. Here at this stop a biker pulled up opposite without being hailed and offered a lift. He seemed to  indicate one by one, two trips. A smiling gap­toothed fellow around forty. Susie was adamant: No. No.  Tidak. A number of times the man needed to be told.               In the end we went down the last half to Pakem by ojek riding with a young mother who had  been assisting at a roadside stall. The sister would look after the business while she was gone, R20k for  two trips. Her little girl would not be left behind, she rode standing inside her mother's legs in the usual  way in Indonesia. There was no second helmet—nothing for the child. In her cover Susie needed to ride  side­saddle, over a quarter hour before the escort returned.               At Pakem the young woman had suggested the Terminal for a bus. The market adjacent had  closed, a woman on the far side just covering her cabbage. Lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes otherwise.  We had had no lunch, there had been no time. Susie had never eaten tomato.               — Like this?...               The woman had obliged by washing the red marbles with water from a bottle.               — Ya Suze. All bar this core here. Try it, enak.               Not perfectly ripened, hard on the outside but hidden softness within. The juice surprised Susie,  forcing her to bend forward. (Grandma Rose had never happened upon a tomato in the Herzegovina no  more than Susie in Madura, or even previously Central Java. Such a great deal in the region returned  one to the mythic past of the family saga told by Bab over many years.)               There was in fact an empty dilapidated angkot parked directly before us. Off the roadway it was  unclear whether it was capable of motion. (A Terminal was a grandiose description for this dusty Wild  West back­lot of tumble­down woodwork.)               One of the chaps in the knot of curious onlookers turned out to be the bus­driver. Suze had  enquired earlier while waiting: the man wanted R25k. each to the outskirts of Kota Jogja. 81