The Linnet's Wings Blackbird Dock - Page 78

              She had noticed the failure to make the sighting.               — Oya!... Directly ahead the road arrowed straight at the base.               A little embarrassing. Susie had heard too many times the strange enthusiasm for the volcano.  There were no volcanoes on Madura. A year ago Susie had been up close to Merapi from a different  direction. Montenegro was full of mountains, nothing but, Susie had been told.               In over four months in Jogja over three separate visits the giant had been previously sighted on  three single occasions. Once was from the hotel window quite unexpectedly after a clearing shower  near the end of the first trip. Second was on the return to Jogja six months later one afternoon walking  up as usual from Malioboro just past the station. A schoolboy had been stopped on a bicycle in order to  confirm the identification. Third again perfectly accidentally climbing the steps to the plane for departure.  Like the monsters from the fables, appearances of the volcano—an ever­present danger to the entire  region for all the shrouding of cloud—did not take place just when one wanted.               Twin peaks. On the second viewing from near the station the dual peaks up on the horizon had  also been visible. What was Merapi’s companion called?               No. There was only one Merap. Another trick of perspective relative to the approach.               It was smoking.               No again from Susie. Cloud; the other option.               But this was wispy cloud all in the single direction like a child’s drawing of a smoking chimney  back in the same distant school­day past of the old FB.               — Not sure about that Susie. You certain? The driver will know. Ask him.               Asap, smoking. Thin, low, almost horizontal smoke. Clear sign of the mountain’s life. After a long  lead­time Sinabung in Sumatra had blown a few days prior, ten thousand people evacuated from the  upper reaches. Beside the road later we would pass an Evacuation Resource Centre.               Initially the dr iver said he was only going as far as Pakem, still an hour out of Kaliurang. We  would need to wait for another bus near the market there. Half hour prior to Pakem the rising ground  had been noticed, nasi fields either side and segments of forest through the thinning roadside housing  palisades. The market at Pakem presented the same old women with their fruit and vegetables sitting  along a shaded path. This was a more central location; around by the bus terminal a rickety tumbledown  market might have done less trade.               In the event, a short while later the same driver returned. He would take us up to Kaliurang.  Twenty thousand to Pakem and the same to Kaliurang for two. Four dollars.               Now the road climbed a stronger gradient, testing the horsepower of the old angkot. Plan, plan,  the driver was encouraged. No­one was in a hurry.               The horn was vital on the roads in Indon cities. The horn had almost never been heard in Jogja  blasted in anger. As a warning in overtaking, especially for larger vehicles, it was a life­saver. The  driving was remarkable, the use of the whole of the road, the fine judgment and consideration—one had  become accustomed over four/five months on Java.               Climbing, climbing. There had been a golf course marked on the maps, quite high on the  ridges. Numerous tennis courts. On the descent a serious doubles game with a forceful serve and  players kitted in branded apparel. (The urge to get Susie to tell these boys the current world Number  One was a near relative was suppressed.)               With one thing and another we had left a little late. The driver warned after 2PM it would be  difficult to find transport returning. At the time it sounded like bluff of some kind.               Up at Kaliurang the beast was not visible; it had retreated to its lair. Earlier the grey sides down  along the Western flank showed what must have been recent ash. Good fecund soil it made. That was  why farmers camped so close to the crater; in fact lived up at the heights. The tree­line seemed to stop  a short distance from the town. Smoke kept drifting in the same direction, the wind light westerly—up at  78