The Linnet's Wings Blackbird Dock - Page 72

          You can imagine the amount of non­stop slogging that Mother did all those years.  Service to so  many people in Chennai, Masti, and Bengaluru.  She is now 88 and continues the same service  oriented life.  She cooks food, cleans up the house to the extent her weakening body and aching bones  can, manages the house expenditure, supervises the maid servant, purchases vegetables and fruits  from the vendors who pass by our house shouting their heads off about the prices of potatoes and  onions and tomatoes, minds the house when the rest of us have to go off for a function or a movie, and  gives advice and care to me and my sisters whenever we need it.  Hers continues to be a full­time job.           I asked her once why she couldn't ease back from all this, why not take life easy, wasn't she tired  of serving others all her life?            She said she doesn't know what the word "tired" means.  And she added, "When I work for  others, it gives me joy, my life has meaning.  I feel I was born to be of service to others."           Yet, I know that Mother is not all that happy; she has her own demons that she won't confide in  any of us.  I suspect it's because she hasn't found in any of us someone truly devoted to her after all  these years of service to us.  I do try but she doesn't trust me fully because of my past marriages that  took me away from her.  How do I know this?           It happened thus: my niece and I admitted Mother to the hospital for gall bladder stone operation  at the famous Ramaiah Hospital in Mathikere, Bengaluru.  The operation was a success and she was  wheeled out of the theater and put in the special room that we had booked for her.  She was still semi­ conscious.  When she came out of her anaesthetized state, even as we, my niece and I peered at her  over the bed, the first words she uttered was, "Bhanu, where is she?"  This despite Bhanu not being  anywhere near the hospital the whole day or the previous two days preparatory to admitting Mother to  the hospital.           Bhanu is the eldest of my sisters.  She was the one who supported Mother when I went away,  pursuing my love.  She was the one who comforted Mother in her darkest days.  Even now, years after  that operation, despite years of my penitent service to Mother, despite Bhanu not being available for  Mother as much as she wants, her face lights up at the mention of Bhanu's name.  Such are the  irretrievable turns that Life takes.           So, what is it I am trying to underline here?  Some impressions last forever despite changed  circumstances.  And also this: When you serve others, you must do it happily.           Yes, there are those who claim that one doesn't need to be happy himself or herself to spread  happiness.  That results in a not perfect circle of spread happiness, gain happiness; the jagged circle I  was talking about earlier.  I would not fully subscribe to it for the simple reason that it doesn't spell logic  to me and as I said under "Numbers", this whole universe is mathematics.  What is the mathematics in  this instance: if you are not happy yourself, how can the person you are trying to make happy be  comfortable with the happiness that you want to give?  Wouldn't he or she feel some guilt, some  discomfort?  That small measure of guilt or discomfort is enough to spoil the happiness that you are  trying to establish in that person.           I am not talking of absolute happiness.  I am saying you have to be reasonably happy yourself to  make others happy.  That is my belief and I will stick to it.  Even a child can sense if you aren't happy  72