The Linnet's Wings Blackbird Dock - Page 32

don’t think anyone who doesn’t love the water could survive such a place.                       Ages ago, I sailed across to Connecticut in a 16 foot run­about with a boy I was convinced I  loved. We launched from another town north and west of here.  I was only fifteen, when all of life seems  endless.  It astounds me now.  To think back with so much clarity about nothing.  And who can say?  Who  can say I wasn’t correct being totally in love with my life, then, as I knew it; and only knew it then.                     I’ve been told things that I don’t believe yet nevertheless have made me weaken.  Even a  straight­forward lie can weaken you body and spirit if it’s heard repeatedly.  Then there is the lack of love.  You can’t bolster it with bright pillows, paint its door pink, or sail it across to Connecticut.                       In the rented cottage, kneeling in front of an old walnut bookcase, I'm thinking this would be  a sweet place for a young woman to bring up a child.  Through narrow mullioned windows I watch the  October sun fading.  Gulls line up on a roof top across the street.  A tricky time of day.  For many  reasons.  I used to pour some wine and sip alone during this time of day.  Our son Cody, grown up now,  lives thousands of miles away.  Here, alone in the cottage, I somehow haven’t felt the need to pour the  wine.  Though I do feel my feet getting cold without socks.                      I tug on the right side door of the double­door bookcase.  It sticks then opens.  I lean in  breathing the smell of old things.  Someone’s mementos.  Memories.  They have an odor.  There are so  many cracked leather books.  Taking one out I’m careful how I handle it.  I take out a few others.  Some  so delicate the pages could easily crumble.  Inside an embossed brown leather book, I discover the  tiniest curled worm – poking it with my finger.  I never knew the bookworm was real, thought it was a  myth, until now.  It seems to be alive yet doesn’t uncurl to me.  Like a dead baby’s finger. Remembering  the child I lost, the one I didn’t realize was growing in me, I close the book gently, placing it back on the  shelf where it belongs.                                 Ella, the realtor who rented me the cottage said, “This must be your lucky day.  Cheap for  such a good place.”  She handed me two keys.  I stared at them in my palm.                                          “Why two?”                     “Well,” she said winking.  “In case you lose one.”                     I’ve felt lucky in spurts.  Both times I got married I felt lucky.  Even when my first turned  quickly to sadness.  I felt lucky getting out, both of us relatively unharmed while still so young.   If you  have to get out, it’s best to do it early.                       Luckily, the cottage came furnished.  Not exactly what I’d choose but comfy things like a  retro movie.  A few antiques.  It’s nice sitting at the speckled formica table having a meal or cup of tea.  The vinyl chairs are cracking but the bright tomato­ red makes them cheery.  When I shift, they squeak  like canaries.   According to Ella, some man who lives in California owns the cottage.  Hasn’t been back  in twenty years.  Twenty years?  How can she pin it down so precisely?  A man painted the door pale­ pink?  Surprising.  While Jack, on the other hand, built us a glass house.  He’s so damned proud of the  place.  Never mind I hated living in a fishbowl.   Leaning my chin on my knuckles, at the table, I’m  thinking of buying a couple of long silk nightgowns.  Winter is coming and silk is good for keeping warm.                        Waking slowly, I can hear the wind gusting; the beginnings of winter approaching.  At night  there’s a chill off The Sound, just a few blocks over.  The sky seems blacker, more turbulent, than when I  lived at the glass house.                     My first day here I picked up basic items – underwear, T­shirts, shorts and light weight jeans  and a green sweatshirt from the local something­Mart.  Cosmetics and toiletries, a brush and hair dryer.  With winter coming, I really need to get to a mall.  Back at the glass house I left some real beauties, very  nice clothes, many quite expensive.  Why this makes me laugh out loud, I don’t know.  Stretching, I laugh  32