The Doppler Quarterly Spring 2019 - Page 14

To succeed in the cloud, organizations need a holistic approach to training that covers all the skills necessary, from process to tools. They need programs targeted and tailored to their institutions’ individual requirements, providing assessments, guided learning paths based on roles, active measurements and plans designed to continually improve operations in the future. In short, one-size training does not fit all when it comes to cloud. There are three critical success factors that have been identified for helping organizations to successfully upskill their teams: 1) find effective methods to assess the current skills of employees; 2) define and assign tailored, role-based learning paths which effectively and efficiently help individuals to progress in their skills; and 3) establish metrics and reporting that enable team leaders and decision-mak- ers to know whether the training program is having the appropriate, needed effect. To succeed in the cloud, organizations need a holistic approach to training that covers all the skills necessary, from process to tools. A Different Kind of Training Back when on-premises data centers managed every- body’s IT needs, training was important, but it was less of a challenge. To manage a server, router or network, a data center professional had to be trained on how to operate that particular piece of hardware. Hardware providers typically offered support packages that included free training for whoever needed it. Training in data centers was like mathematics – learning sets of skills that build on each other. Just like in math, where you master arithmetic and then move on to advanced top- ics like trigonometry and calculus, managing servers and software tools required IT leaders to learn technologies from the ground up. Things are different in the cloud. There are no products to pick up and look at. In the cloud, IT pros need to know how to provision an environment to handle applications. They need to understand scripting languages and tools associated with whatever is being done with specific applications. There are many more moving parts in a cloud environment, and many more skills which need to be sharpened. In the public cloud you have to learn the particular cloud platform – AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google – and then each tool that goes with that platform. Tools on one platform do not necessarily work on other platforms. The tools themselves that perform import- ant functions – configuration management, logging, monitoring, security, administration – all work very differently on different cloud platforms. 12 | THE DOPPLER | SPRING 2019