Techlandia September 2017 - Page 45

Techlandia 43 “I realized the market was ready right now, and I had to release my software as soon as possible,” Brown said. “I went to code school in Portland, and I decided to use my skills to build the first prototype to show to HR professionals.” Brown connected with other innovators at code school and found a strong teammate to help make her plan a reality. She didn’t need investors to get off the ground; she just needed the right partners to believe in the market and her vision. “I realized the market was ready right now, and I had to release my software as soon as possible.” So what piece of advice does Brown have for others thinking of bootstrapping their startup? “Don’t waste money on marketing and business development. Invest your resources in creating the best product possible,” Brown said. “Also ask for help—the tech community in Oregon wants great founders to succeed. Most successful founders remember the pain of just starting out.” Brown believes the market is ready to embrace diversity, and is determined to make ScoutSavvy an end-to-end solution that gives women the tools they need to get hired in the right companies. She also wants to help companies find talent with diversity recruiting tools that increase their reach and decrease unconscious bias during the hiring process. “We just launched our recruiting app in the Portland market. Based on the positive response, we are rolling out a full Diversity- as-a-Service solution,” Brown said. “Our big vision is to become the go-to source of diversity analytics for governments, non- profits and chief of diversity officers at enterprise companies.” Brown thinks that Oregon’s strong DIY culture is what makes its workforce so unique and what attracts so many big brands to the area. “Whether we’re making biodynamic wine or building custom furniture, we tend to be creative without asking permission,” Brown said. “Don’t waste money on marketing and business development. Invest your resources in creating the best product possible. Also ask for help—the tech community in Oregon wants great founders to succeed. Most successful founders remember the pain of just starting out.”