Strategies for Student Success 2015 - Page 5

classrooms to provide feedback and learn from what works. Teacher-designed creative scheduling facilitates more interventions for students. For example, the music teacher figured out a way to take on the entire fourth grade during one class session, allowing teachers to have an extra common planning period. This, in turn, has allowed for more enrichment activities for the school’s highest performers. Another teacher-initiated effort that made a big difference was the departmentalization of fourth and fifth grades. With permission from the district, teachers in these grades specialized based on subject matter, and kids rotate between classes during the day. “That has made a huge difference for us here,” Ms. Roeder said. “Teachers are no longer making six lesson plans each day and differentiating within that.” A new program at the school this year applies Carol Dweck’s “growth mindset” research in a personal development effort for students. Finding great inspiration in the idea that traits like motivation and perseverance drive academic growth, teachers have identified a key personal trait to focus on each month and built reinforcement of those characteristics into school life. A monthly assembly focuses on each trait. Plastic wristbands with different values are worn by teachers all day, and when students demonstrate these traits, they get a wristband to wear. The idea came from sessions attended at the 2015 Model Schools Conference, an initiative of the International Center for Leadership in Education. Rather than send just a few to the well-regarded event, Ms. Roeder and the Andersonville community worked hard to enable almost all of the faculty to attend for the past two years. Registration fees alone were nearly $500 for each participant, making this no small investment. With the help of 4 classrooms to provide feedback and learn from what works. Teacher-designed creative scheduling facilitates more interventions for students. For example, the music teacher figured out a way to take on the entire fourth grade during one class session, allowing teachers to have an extra common planning period. This, in turn, has allowed for more enrichment activities for the school’s highest performers. Another teacher-initiated effort that made a big difference was the departmentalization of fourth and fifth grades. With permission from the district, teachers in these grades specialized based on subject matter, and kids rotate between classes during the day. “That has made a huge difference for us here,” Ms. Roeder said. “Teachers are no longer making six lesson plans each day and differentiating within that.” A new program at the school this year ap- plies Carol Dweck’s “growth mindset” research in a personal development effort for students. Finding great inspiration in the idea that traits like motivation and perseverance drive academic growth, teachers have identified a key personal trait to focus on each month and built reinforcement of those characteristics into school life. A monthly assembly focuses on each trait. Plastic wristbands with different values are worn by teachers all day, and when students demonstrate these traits, they get a wristband to wear. The idea came from sessions attended at the 2015 Model Schools Conference, an initiative of the International Center for Leadership in Education. Rather than send just a few to the well-regard Y][ \ˈY\[H[\۝[H[][]HܚY\[XH[[[وHX[B][܈H\YX\ˈY\][ۈY\˜[ۙH\HX\H L ܈XX\X\[ XZ[\X[[\Y[ ]H[ق