State of Education survey report 2016 - Page 19

Why aren ’ t pupils ’ school-ready ?
We listed some reasons why children might not be at the expected level when they enter school , either at primary or secondary stage , and asked school leaders to tell us which reasons most commonly apply in their setting . Overall , a lack of social skills is the most-cited reason when responses are pooled from both phases , with almost three-quarters ( 72 %) of school leaders selecting it from our list . The next most-cited reasons are a lack of self-help skills / resilience ( 66 %) and delayed speech ( 65 %).
When comparing the experiences of the different phases , we see that lower than expected academic levels are the most common reasons for poor school-readiness among pupils entering secondary school . Lower than expected reading levels is cited by over three-quarters of secondary school leaders ( 76 %), followed by lower writing levels ( 63 %) and lower numeracy levels ( 56 %).
At primary level , more school leaders considered a lack of social skills ( 79 %) to be one of the most common reasons for children not being at the expected level when they join ; delayed speech ( 78 %) and a lack of self-help skills / resilience ( 69 %) were the next most selected options .
Both primary and secondary school leaders say that low self-esteem is in part responsible for pupils not being school-ready . A third ( 33 %) of primary leaders cite it as a contributing factor , and more than four in 10 ( 47 %) of those in secondary settings .
More needs to be done to help parents understand what ‘ school ready ’ means and what they can practically do to help . Language and socialisation would be at the top of the list for most schools but we need to be specific and clear about what to work on .
Perhaps schools need to build relationships with families much earlier . In many cases parents have a clear idea which school their children will attend . Perhaps we should be providing more support for prospective parents and helping them understand what we hope to see when children join the school .
We live in a very different world from the one we grew up in , where screen time is increasingly replacing social interaction as a way of spending time . Resistance is futile on this one , so we have to find ways to use technology healthily to promote language development and interaction skills . We also need to help parents understand just how valuable and enhancing real-life interactions are . There is no substitute for story reading or playing a board game which requires discussion , but technology can still enhance these activities .
As in so many aspects of learning , the key is to build a trusting , non-judgemental partnership between school and home ."
Andrew Teale Headteacher , St Paul ' s Church of England Primary School and National Leader of Education
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Why aren’t pupils’ school-ready? We listed some reasons why children might not be at the expected level when they enter school, either at primary or secondary stage, and asked school leaders to tell us which reasons most commonly apply in their setting. Overall, a lack of social skills is the most-cited reason when responses are pooled from both phases, with almost three-quarters (72%) of school leaders selecting it from our list. The next most-cited reasons are a lack of self-help skills/resilience (66%) and delayed speech (65%). When comparing the experiences of the different phases, we see that lower than expected academic levels are the most common reasons for poor school-readiness among pupils entering secondary school. Lower than expected reading levels is cited by over three-quarters of secondary school leaders (76%), followed by lower writing levels (63%) and lower numeracy levels (56%). At primary level, more school leaders considered a lack of social skills (79%) to be one of the most common reasons for children not being at the expected level when they join; delayed speech (78%) and a lack of self-help skills/resilience (69%) were the next most selected options. Both primary and secondary school leaders say that low self-esteem is in part responsible for pupils not being school-ready. A third (33%) of primary leaders cite it as a contributing factor, and more than four in 10 (47%) of those in secondary settings. More needs to be done [\[[\[]8&XYx&HYX[[]^H[XX[H[ [XYH[X[\][ۂ[H]HوH\܈[]BYYHXYX[X\X]]ܚۋ\\YYZ[[][ۜ\][Z[Y\›]XX\Y\[X[H\\\[]HHX\YXBXZ\[[[][ \\H[HݚY[[ܙH\ܝ܈X]H\[[[[[H[\[]HHYH[[[[H H]H[H\HY\[ܛHHۙHHܙ]\[\HܙY[[YH\[ܙX\[H\X[X[[\X[ۈ\H^Hو[[[YK\\[H\][Bۈ\ۙKH]H[^\\HXBX[[H[H[XYH][Y[[[\X[ۈ[ˈH[YY[\[[\[\[XXH[[[[X[ [YH[\X[ۜ\K\H\X]]H܈ܞHXY[܈^Z[H\[YHX\]Z\\\\[ۋ]XH[[[[H\HX]]Y\˂\[X[H\XوX\[H^H\Z[B\[ۋZY[Y[[\\\]Y[B[YK[]X[BXYXX\][ \و[[BBBB[X\H[][ۘ[XY\وYX][ۂB[HX]HR^T\ܝ]HوYX][ۈ\^H M˝Z^\\ܝ BNB