Solutions June 2018 - Page 15

its climax. In my haste to get to the back of the barn and begin cleaning the waste, I lifted my leg, leaving my boot firmly fixed like a helpless soul in quicksand. There, in naked splendor, my foot continued rising, until reaching its peak and hurriedly descending into the thick strata of cow patties. My attention was now fully engaged: my entire foot submerged, my toes feeling the wet sensation of what had once been in the bowels and kidneys of the animals. When I finally freed my foot, it was a sight that could only be cleaned off with the help of our garden hose, strong soap, and a lot of heavy scrubbing. I slept with my foot on top of my sheets as I lay in bed that night. We’ve reached the point in our nation where we’re long past the time when we should have cleaned up our barn. We’ve allowed ourselves to be amused nearly to the point of death, distracted by pleasures before taking care of the hard work that makes lasting pleasure possible. There is no fast way out of our predicament, yet we must work as quickly as possible to turn things around. The good news is that slow and steady still win the day. But in order to win the day, we have to mount up with humble courage and shore up the fundamental cracks in our foundation that have led to our creating, and in some cases inheriting, such a dirty barn. Right now we need long-term commitment to attentive, steady leadership in our personal lives, our families, our houses of worship, and our nation. What follows is a battle plan that, if embraced by even a minority of ...we have to mount up with “ humble courage and shore up the fundamental cracks in our foundation that have led to our creating, and in some cases inheriting, such a dirty barn.” Solutions • 15