Small Business Today Magazine MAR 2016 AMERICAN SERVICES - Page 18

EDITORIAL FEATURE When the Rules Don’t Fit the Game                     By Hank Moore, Corporate Strategist It’s not that some organizations “click” and others do not. Multiple factors cause momentum or the lack thereof. As companies operate, all make honest and predictable mistakes. Those with a willingness to learn from the mistakes and pursue growth will be successful. Others will remain stuck in a frame of mind that sets themselves up for the next round of defeat or, at best, partial success. E very business, company, or organization goes through cycles in its evolution. At any point, each program or business unit is in a different phase from the others. Every astute organization assesses the status of each branch on its growth strategies and orients its management and team members to meet constant changes and fluctuations. It’s not that some organizations “click” and others do not. Multiple factors cause momentum or the lack thereof. As companies operate, all make honest and predictable mistakes. Those with a willingness to learn from the mistakes and pursue growth will be successful. Others will remain stuck in a frame of mind that sets themselves up for the next round of defeat or, at best, partial success. The saddest fact is that businesses do not always know that they’re doing anything wrong. They do not realize that a Big Picture must exist or what it could look like. They have not been taught or challenged on how to craft a Big Picture. Managers, by default, see band-aid surgery as the only remedy for problems. Is it any wonder that organizations stray off course? Perhaps no course was ever charted. Perhaps the order of business was to put out fires as they arose rather than practicing preventive safety on the kindling organization. 7 Layers of Organizations that Go Bad 1. Self Destructive Intelligence. There exists a logic override. Since the company does not believe itself to be smart enough to do the right things, then it creates a web of rationalism. Since the mind often plays tricks on itself, management capitalizes upon that phenomenon with people who may question or criticize. 16 SMALL BUSINESS TODAY MAGAZINE [ MARCH 2016 ] 2. Hubris. This quality destroys those who possess it. Such executives exhibit stubborn pride, believing their own spin doctoring, and surrounding themselves with people who spin quite well on their behalf. They adopt a “nobody does it as well as we can” mentality. Such companies scorn connections, collaborations, and partnering with other organizations. 3. Arrogance. Omnipotent fantasies cause management to go too far. The feeling is that nothing is beyond their capacity to succeed (defined in their minds as crushing all other competition). 4. Narcissism. Company executives possess excessive conceit. They are self-centered, show a cruel indifference to others, and are disconnected from outside forces. Their view is that the world must gratify them. 5. Unconscious Need to Fail. These companies try too hard to keep on winning. With victory as the only possible end game, all others must be defeated along the way. In reality, these people and their organizations possess low self-esteem. Inevitably, they get beaten at their own games. 6. Feeling of Entitlement. Walls and filters have been established which insulate top management from criticism (which is viewed as harming the chain of armor rather than as potentially constructive). Anger stimulates many of their decisions. The feeling is that they deserve it all. Power satisfies appetites. These executives have poor human relations skills. They believe that excesses are always justified. 7. Collective Dumbness. Such organizations have totally reshaped reality to their own