Sky's Up Summer 2016 - Page 44

the art of astronomy the art of astronomy Astrophotographer: Jack B. Newton Astrophotographer: Mark Sibole Comet Catalina Comet Catalina, otherwise known as C/2013 US10, blazes across the night sky in this image that Newton captured using a 14” Hyperstar at f/2 and a Canon 40D with an exposure time of 10 minutes. Originally misidentified as an asteroid, this stunning Oort Cloud comet was discovered on Oct. 31, 2013, by the Catalina Sky Survey. After its brush with the Sun, the comet is likely on a trajectory that will take it out of our Solar System. M27 — Dumbbell Nebula The bright, double-lobed Dumbbell Nebula shines in this image by Sibole. Easy to find with binoculars and amazing in a telescope, this resident of the Vulpecula Constellation was the first planetary nebula ever discovered. As an added bonus, the white dwarf that lies at the heart of the Dumbbell Nebula is larger than any other star of its kind. To get this image, Sibole used an Explore Scientific 102mm apochromatic refractor piggybacked on a 10” Meade LX200, a Starlight Xpress SXVF-H9 camera and a True Tech 8-position filter wheel. NGC 2264 In this image, Newton showcases one of the Monoceros Constellation’s most outstanding features — NGC 2264. The diverse components of this celestial treasure include the star-rich Christmas Tree Cluster, the brilliant star system S Monocerotis and the Cone Nebula, which is 7 lights years long. It was taken with an Explore Scientific 6” apochromatic refractor, an SBIG STF-8300C camera and a total of 245 minutes of exposure time. NGC 3628 NGC 3628, which is also known as the Hamburger Galaxy, is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy. It also is the faintest member of the Leo Triplet galaxy group, which also features the spiral galaxies Messier 65 and Messier 66. Sibole captured the image using an Explore Scientific 102mm apochromatic refractor piggybacked on a 10” Meade LX200, a Starlight Xpress SXVF-H9 camera and a True Tech 8-position filter wheel. 44 Sky’s Up Sky’s Up 45