SEVENSEAS Marine Conservation & Travel Issue 15, August 2016 - Page 55

press box to be used for the Olympics; I made note to go speak to one of the construction workers that week. As I watched joggers, bikers, skateboarders, dog walkers, personal trainers and their clients, craft-makers, tourists, and cariocas (locals) walk down the black and white sidewalks, I couldn’t help but wonder if anyone in Rio ever worked; to be fair to Rio, I often wonder the same when the gym is full at 1:00 pm on a Tuesday in Miami. Over the next six days I would spend hours exploring the city, talking to locals, trying some amazing new foods, watching breathtaking sunrises and sunsets, and learning why cariocas are simultaneously so incredibly proud of their city while remaining so ashamed of their leadership.

Some of my favorite tourist activities included seeing the statue of Christ the Redeemer (Cristo Redentor) that overlooks the city up close and personal, hiking through the Tijuca National Park, exploring the Museum of Tomorrow (Museu do Amanha) and Museu de Arte do Rio (Art Museum of Rio), seeing the sunset from Sugarloaf Mountain (Pão do Açúcar), hiking Arpoador (a rock formation where Copacabana meets Ipanema), and hang gliding over Rio and the Atlantic Ocean. For anyone who even slightly enjoys being active, Rio is like heaven on earth.

Some of my favorite tourist activities included seeing the statue of Christ the Redeemer (Cristo Redentor) that overlooks the city up close and personal, hiking through the Tijuca National Park, exploring the Museum of Tomorrow (Museu do Amanha) and Museu de Arte do Rio (Art

Museum of Rio), seeing the sunset from Sugarloaf Mountain (Pão do Açúcar), hiking Arpoador (a rock formation where Copacabana meets Ipanema), and hang gliding over Rio and the Atlantic Ocean. For anyone who even slightly enjoys being active, Rio is like heaven on earth.

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