Scale Aviator International Magazine Issue 3 - Page 80

Since we need to take our photos at the same relative height as in our BG photos, it is now necessary to lay down on the ground. As my model is 1/6th scale, that means my camera should be at 1-foot above the ground to match the 6-foot average photographer’s eye-line. Obviously, you will need to adjust this depending on the scale of your own model. Now it is time to check our notes again, and point our camera in the same compass direction as we did in our B- photos. Also, make sure to aim it up or down to match the angle in your notes so it will match the BG- photos. You can see what we are doing here, right? In order to have our model look like it is full-sized, we need to photograph it in the same relative positions and angles as we did our ‘imaginary’ full-sized aircraft. As long as we match all our notes, and take the model photos at the same time of day, the same compass-heading, the same horizontal angle, and same relative height, and of course, have our model in the same position as our ‘imaginary’ fullsized plane, these photos will have the same look and conditions as our BG-photos, and that means they will easily match up when we composite them together later in ‘Phase-Three’. It should also be noted at this point that by comparing our BG-photos, and the photos of our model, we can plainly see that the sun is coming from the same position in the sky, and the shadows are also the same relative length and intensity. And so, it is just that easy! The more care you spend on these steps in Phase-One and Two, the Figure 9. Tony patiently aggravates his lower back as I take these photos. Since we need to take our photos at the same relative height as in our BG photos, it is now necessary to lay down on the ground. As my model is 1/6th scale, that means my camera should be at 1-foot above the ground to match the 6-foot average photographer’s eye-line. 80