Rodeo Fame Fall Issue 2018 - Page 27

Who says I’m a nice girl? On the coasts, it’s reception has been divided but those it spoke to have gone back to see it in theaters as many as four times. It’s honest, raw and sometimes brutal on the emotions as reality always is, but it’s unblinkingly authentic and found strong voices in unpredictable places. The voice of the Badlands is strong. The horses play themselves as heartbreakers and healers, always quietly teaching. The unwritten, unspoken ethics of the Cowboy Code is woven into the fabric of the men and women as their stories unfold, but it’s likely the voice of a young, Lakota cowboy, no longer able to speak or escape his wheelchair since a car accident that is loudest and binds audiences to Brady’s struggle in choosing to continue to ride horses that buck or be bound strictly by his doctor’s orders to leave that life behind. “I’d never met Lane Scott, I only knew him through what Brady and Cat Clifford had told me, but I felt strongly he had a part to play in The Rider,” Zhao said. “We were shooting in western South Dakota, Lane’s rehab facility is in Omaha, Nebraska. We loaded up and went there, trusting a big part of our small budget to what we all believed we’d find.” “We shot everything we needed in four hours – that’s an intense day. I met Lane with the intention that I wasn’t going to treat him any differently than his friends. He was amazing. He improvised and ad-libbed through hand signing the alphabet. I didn’t write ‘rub some dirt on it’, Lane’s response when Brady told him about cracking his skull and having the steel plate surgically installed,” said Zhao. “They wanted to work, to tell this story. Some scenes took several takes just in moving the camera angle. I don’t think Brady had seen him much, if at all, since either of their accidents. It was truthful and emotionally stunning.” The biggest critics were bound to be cowboys and ranchers, who’s authenticity is innate and judgement is always the harshest. They’re saying The Rider left them speechless. They’re also saying it’s on the same rare plane as Lonesome Dove. The question then becomes ‘how did a nice, urban girl from Beijing find her way to Pine Ridge to tell a story so real it’s touched souls globally?’ In answer, Zhao’s voice lowered a notch and picked up a velvety growl worthy of one at home in the Badlands. “Who says I’m a nice girl?” – Chloe Zhao The Rider was recently released on DVD. Photos by Jon Pearson Photo/Courtesy of QLI Chloe Zhao helps steady the camera during the filming of one of The Rider’s most powerful scenes with Lane Scott and Brady Jandreau. www.rodeofame.com 27 Who says I’m a nice girl? On the coasts, it’s reception has been divided but those it spoke to have gone back to see it in theaters as many as four times. It’s honest, raw and sometimes brutal on the emotions as reality always is, but it’s unblinkingly authentic and found strong voices in unpredictable places. The voice of the Badlands is strong. The horses play themselves as heartbreakers and healers, always quietly teaching. The unwritten, unspoken ethics of the Cowboy Code is woven into the fabric of the men and women as their stories unfold, but it’s likely the voice of a young, Lakota cowboy, no longer able to speak or escape his wheelchair since a car accident that is loudest and binds audiences to Brady’s struggle in choosing to continue to ride horses that buck or be bound strictly by his doctor’s orders to leave that life behind. “I’d never met Lane Scott, I only knew him through what Brady and Cat Clifford had told me, but I felt strongly he had a part to play in The Rider,” Zhao said. “We were shooting in western South Dakota, Lane’s rehab facility is in Omaha, Nebraska. We loaded up and went there, trusting a big part of our small budget to what we all believed we’d find.” “We shot everything we needed in four hours – that’s an intense day. I met Lane with the intention that I wasn’t going to treat him any differently than his friends. He was amazing. He improvised and ad-libbed through hand signing the alphabet. I didn’t write ‘rub some dirt on it’, Lane’s response when Brady told him about cracking his skull and having the steel plate surgically installed,