Review/Oorsig Volume 22, Issue 05 - Page 20

Oorsig/Review Figure 01: Testing for EBL parlour and died half an hour later from the haemorrhage. I did confirm histopathologically and in the first case (10 years ago) we bled about 50 cows and they were all positive, so culling was not an option. They are two of the top herds in the district and don't have any obvious problems other than these odd acute deaths. I have not surveyed beef cattle in the area, but touch wood all bulls bled at fertility testing so far have been negative. We had 3 flocks with fairly severe Jaagsiekte in the Hogsback and Dordrecht areas for many years, but I have also not seen a case or p/m for the past 3 years - not reported or disappeared? AL - 29 Jun 2005 Any ideas why a herd with a known high incidence of EBL seropositive cows, suddenly have 4 cows die in the space of two weeks a.r.o. CLINICAL EBL? That is to say, large intra-abdominal / intrathoracic tumours confirmed on histopath. I have in the past approx. 12 years only seen 3 cases of clinical EBL. My understanding was that the incidence of lymphocytosis and / or clinical cases in seropositive animals was very low.??? GK - 30 Jun 2005 The few, 6 that I can think off, (Clinical EBL) cows that I have seen have all been on post mortem, within a week of calving. They had died from heart failure with massive tumours throughout the heart, lymph nodes, omentum. But you are correct in saying that very few seropositive cows/ herds show clinical cases. Bearing in mind that a lot of cows are sick and die out there with no veterinary involvement, there may just be more cases we never see. TC - 26 Jun 2009 KZN seems to have >65% dairy herds infected. Some districts are much higher than that. Dr Mohammed Moola investigated this at Allerton 20 in the '90s. Herds themselves can have > 70% seropositive. Incidences (not incidents) of clinical cases in the highly infected herds seem to go up and down. We are also doing the ostrich act; and have enormous respect for colleagues using new gloves, needles, etc. (for each animal) Our opinion, and I speak for a huge number of KZN colleagues who prefer not to expose themselves on this medium, is that so long as there are biting insects around one is hiccupping against thunder ... but is this "best practice"?! If my memory serves me correctly, and perhaps Hans can comment, in the USA eradication has been largely forsaken. EdP - 29 Jun 2009 I have recently started testing in a herd that I am involved with and found the same. Had a case where a cow died acutely after calving and on post mortem found that the heart muscle was severely affected. ML - 16 Sep 2013 I clearly remember being told that there was no BVD or Bovine Leucosis in South Africa by the local state vet years ago. Only to see the explosion that occurred within ten years of that statement. We live in a changing global village where these things are going to become all the more common. DM - 16 Sep 2013 A farmer sent me photographs, by BBM, of several sheep that died in the Southern Cape and the lesions look very typical for sheep leucosis. To get these off BBM and onto Ruralvet is beyond my Monday morning capabilities esp. while I’m in a hurry to get to the farm! I recall one specific farm on which we actually diagnosed the disease in sheep many years ago – against/on the foot of the Langeberg Mountain range. My “gut feeling” is that we are/might be missing more than we are actually seeing…