Review/Oorsig Volume 22, Issue 01 - Page 3

Volume 22 • Issue 01 • 2018 CONTENT The Livestock Health and Production Review is published Bi-monthly by Vetlink Copyright reserved. Expressions of opinion, claims and statement of supposed facts do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or publisher. While every effort is made to report accurately, the publisher or the editor does not accept any liability with regard to any statement, advertisement, fact or recommendation made in this magazine. Editor Mark Chimes Production and advertising Madaleen Schultheiss Layout and design Soil, Grass and Rumen Health: How do these relate to extensively grazed cattle herd health 4 Fodder Flow Planning 12 14 Selection for Optimal Production 16 Sarcina Abomasitis and Cryptosporidiosis in a One Week Old Bonsmara Calf 21 The Successful use of Algotherapy in Dairy Cow Production 25 29 Sheep Nutrition Clostridium Disease Sample Collection for Effective Disease Diagnostics Biesmelk en Oordrag van Immuniteit by Kalwers RUVASA/SASVEPM Congress 2018 18 22 EDITOR’s Note Heinrich van Rijn Welcome to the first issue of the Review in 2018. The focus of this edition is nutrition. If, in the old days, you asked a cattle farmer what he does for a living he would have replied that he farms with cattle. In the 1980’s and 1990’s, cattle farmers started to state that they keep cattle and farm with pastures. In the near future cattle farmers will probably be stating that they farm soil organisms. Patron Danie Odendaal Publisher and Owner: Vetlink Publications We welcome any comments, contributions, topic suggestions and letters for publication. Send them to: The Editor, PO Box 232, GROENKLOOF, 0027 Tel: (012) 346 1590, 0825756479 Fax: 086 671 9907 admin@vetlink.co.za Whether you have to plan fodder flow, rumen health or even prevent certain clostridial diseases, it all comes down to nutrition, pasture management and ultimately soil health. For a feedlot or a farm on extensive grazing, all the ruminant feed comes from the soil. Any deficiencies or excesses in the soil will eventually manifest in animal health. Several of these aspects are addressed in this issue. As diverse as the subjects in this edition may appear, they are actually all connected to nutrition and soil health. Enjoy the reading. Warm regards Mark Chimes 3