REI WEALTH MONTHLY ISSUE 41 - Page 27

ARE CRYPTOCURRENCIES A SCAM AND A BUBBLE, OR ARE THEY THE FUTURE? Cynicism About Banks and Other Financial Institutions During the financial crisis, banks are widely perceived as having benefitted from originating and selling  mortgages they knew were destined to fail. Bankers made huge amounts of money, and the world financial  system came very close to collapsing. The public purse (taxpayers) had to bail out the entire banking system,  and yet no bank executive was ever really punished. All of this is well­known and is resented a great deal by  the average American, who makes a  fraction of what bank executives get paid.  One could argue that Donald Trump’s  election was as much as anything a  protest against elites who protected and  coddled Wall Street and big banks, which  banks in turn paid political elites large  sums of money in the form of campaign  contributions and speech fees. While cynicism about banks and Wall  Street has existed for a long time, we may  have reached a tipping point. A recent  Gallup poll noted American’s confidence in  banks had dropped 22 percentage points  in 10 years, from 49% in 2006 to only 27%  in 2016. Conclusion So what are we to make of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies? Are Jamie Dimon and Howard Marks right to  question their legitimacy? Or is Silicon Valley right to say, as one company CEO said recently, that the  blockchain technology behind cryptocurrencies is the single most important innovation since the Internet? It may be that both groups are right. The value of Bitcoin and Etherium may drop dramatically or even go to  near zero. True, there is nothing behind these currencies­­nothing “real”­­other than an agreement and trust  among a group of investors that they should have value.