Red Apple Reading Magazine August-September 2016 - Page 9

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verbal interactions with others . Reading , talking , and pointing out familiar words in everyday life will go a long way in building your child ’ s vocabulary .
Red Apple Reading explicitly teaches over 250 high-frequency words ( from Fry ’ s word lists ). The program also exposes children to thousands of common vocabulary words and teaches them specific vocabulary concepts ( e . g . contractions , abbreviations , homophones , synonyms , antonyms ).
3 ) READ-ALOUDS In addition to developing phonemic awareness and building vocabulary , reading aloud to a child helps model correct reading behaviors . Teachers and parents read with enthusiasm , rhythm , fluency , and the proper intonation so that children hear what good reading sounds like . Read-alouds also allow children to experience the joys of reading long before they can read on their own .
It ’ s no surprise what parents can do here : read to your child more ! Get books from the library , give books for special occasions , go to a bookstore , or swap books with other families to keep plenty of reading materials on hand . Reading doesn ’ t have to just be from picture books either . It can include reading recipes out loud , directions for operating a new gadget , magazines , comic books , and more . Don ’ t make the mistake of thinking that children no longer need to be read to once they can read on their own . Kids of every age benefit from and enjoy a good read-aloud !
There are ten original read-aloud stories in Level A of the Red Apple Reading program for young children to enjoy . Over 50 stories are available altogether in printable format to share with children .
4 ) GUIDED AND SHARED READING In guided reading teachers work with a small number of students who are at the same reading level . Students are given their own book , and the teacher works with each student to help develop the skills they need . During shared reading the teacher and students read together . This helps students discover new words and practice fluency .
Parents can provide support in this area by helping their child read books at the child ’ s current reading level . For young readers these are usually phonics or beginner books . For older kids it might be a chapter book that she or he reads out loud to you each evening or on the weekend . You can practice together by taking turns reading sentences or a page . It also helps to encourage repeated readings of favorite stories , as this helps the child ’ s fluency .
Red Apple Reading Levels B and C have 25 stories with guided practice for early readers . A child can click on any word to hear it read out loud , and in Level B each page can be read aloud to model fluent reading .
5 ) INDEPENDENT READING During independent reading children choose the books they want to read . Usually books are picked out from a school or classroom library . Having a wide variety of books to choose from is essential , offering different genres such as science fiction , mystery , fantasy , historical fiction , and non-fiction or informational books . This is important so that reading becomes an enjoyable experience , not a chore . Keeping children excited about reading helps ensure they will become lifelong readers .
Let children choose the books they get from the library or bookstore . They may enjoy a different genre than you do , and that ’ s okay ! Expose them to a wide variety of books to help figure out what they really like . Recommendations from friends and families with children of a similar age can be helpful too . Remember , what your child reads is not nearly as important as how much he or she reads .
Over 50 stories are available in printable format from Red Apple Reading for children to practice reading independently .
The goal of a balanced approach to reading is to develop competent , lifelong readers . Whether you homeschool or your child attends public school , paying attention to and offering a variety of reading experiences will significantly increase your child ’ s chance at reading success .
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