Pulse June 2018 - Page 57

Survival of the fittest, constant adaption to change—the wilderness and the corporate world have many similarities. The closer you investigate each world—its routines, rules and ways of communication— the more obvious it becomes how beneficial it would be if the business world could learn from nature. We live in times of change— disruptive change that requires new answers and new sets of rules and rituals if you want to climb your way to the top. By Rule Number One in the Wild The first rule about the animal kingdom is: whatever you do, don’t run. This is the first thing I learned when I began my three-month experience as a ranger in South Africa. Still today, I think it is one of the most valuable rules for everyday life and business— no matter if you are a spa owner, manager or therapist. In the wild, there’s a very serious reason for rule number one. Every lion, leopard or other killer beast is faster than a human, so there is no way you could outrun them to protect your life. If you happen to be in that highly dangerous situation, you are far better off to hold your ground and focus your attention and strengths towards the opponent. “...you must promise yourself— and your team—you won’t run. In the wild, this means running away from an attacker, but in business this can mean ignoring issues, avoiding problems and quitting when the going gets tough.” learning from Africa’s most fascinating animals, you open a door to new and helpful ways of thinking and perceiving your own business and leadership skills. It’s a world of unconven- tional wisdom but maybe that’s exactly what businesses need in a world where conventional answers might be flawed. By doing that, your chances of survival increase just like your everyday chance to succeed in tough competition increases if you force yourself to use and focus your talents and strengths to face a challenge head-on. Before moving on to any rule or any advice, you must promise yourself—and your team—you won’t run. In the wild, this means running away from an attacker, but in business this can mean ignoring issues, avoiding problems and quitting when the going gets tough. The Big 5 Leadership Traits During my time in Africa, I learned a lot about what it takes to be a great leader. From native tribe leaders to pack leaders among wild animals to even learning to become a leader myself as a ranger and guide, June 2018 ■ PULSE 55