Property Owners Handbook - Page 19

III. Community Association Parks, Pathways and Roadways the Red mangrove, these provide air to the underground and underwater roots. The leaves of the Black Mangrove are opposite, two to four inches long tapering at the base, shiny above, hairy underneath, and sometimes slightly rolled along the edges. The leaves are often coated with salt crystals eliminated by the tree. Black Mangroves bloom heavily in June and July with white flowers. During the bloom periods, beekeepers set up hives to collect the nectar for the production of mangrove honey. This honey is of very high quality and was produced in the United States until about 1895, when hurricane destruction of the best forests occurred. Interest in the product has been recently renewed. White Mangrove The White Mangrove is generally found above the tide line. While it may have prop roots and/or pneumatophores depending on habitat conditions, most have neither. The White Mangrove is easily differentiated from other mangroves by succulent leaves which are rounded at the base and top and smooth underneath. Two glands, called nectary’s, at the base of the leaf excrete sugar, which some insects feed on. The White Mangrove has a small, dry, leathery, ribbed fruit. It contains dark red seeds and is buoyant, allowing it to float to new growing sites. Its flowers are greenish white and produce good honey. Buttonwood The Buttonwood is in the same family as the White Mangrove, but is often considered only an associate of mangroves. It is shrub-like along the shore and tree-like further inland. The button part of the name comes from the button-like appearance of the rounded flower heads that grow in branched clusters and the purplish-green, round cone-like fruit. While the other mangrove leaves grow opposite, the Buttonwood leaves are alternate, leathery and pointed at the tips, with two glands at the leaf base. When visiting the park, you may catch sight of Bald Eagles soaring overhead en route to Estero Bay. The eagle’s existing nest is found in the north slough, east of the park site. Bonita Bay’s commitment to the preservation of this site is evidenced by the development of Estero Bay Park which has allowed the “Eagle Fly Way” to remain undisturbed. So that you may fully enjoy Estero Bay Park, we ask that you adhere to the following Estero Bay Park rules and regulations: 1. PA R K IN G - Parking of resident and guest vehicles is allowed from dawn until dusk. No overnight parking is allowed for vehicles of any kind, including recreational vehicles, boats and boat trailers. 2. FOOD AND BEVERAGE - When picnicking in the park, remember that campfires are not permitted. Grills are provided for cooking out. We ask that all debris be placed in the appropriate trash receptacles and all personal items be removed. Clean up is the responsibility of the user. If alcoholic beverages are to be served, the sponsor of the event will assume full responsibility. 3. RESERVATIONS - The Pavilion will be open for resident use on a regular basis. However, reservations for the Pavilion for special events will be accepted on a first come, first served basis with the completion of the Reservation Form. The entire park cannot be reserved for one function, in order to make space available to the greatest number of 17 www.BonitaBayResidents.com III . C ommunit y A ssociation Par k s , Pathway s and R oadway s the Red mangrove, these provide air to the underground and underwater roots. The leaves of the Black Mangrove are opposite, two to four inches long tapering at the base, shiny above, hairy underneath, and sometimes slightly rolled along the edges. The leaves are often coated with salt crystals eliminated by the tree. Black Mangroves bloom heavily in June and July with white flowers. During the bloom periods, beekeepers set up hives to collect the nectar for the production of mangrove honey. This honey is of very high quality and was produced in the United States until about 1895, when hurricane destruction of the best forests occurred. Interest in the product has been recently renewed. Buttonwood leaves are alternate, leathery and pointed at the tips, with two glands at the leaf base. White Mangrove The White Mangrove is generally found above the tide line. While it may have prop roots and/or pneumatophores depending on habitat conditions, most have neither. The White Mangrove is easily differentiated from other mangroves by succulent leaves which are rounded at the base and top and smooth underneath. Two glands, called nectary’s, at the base of the leaf excrete sugar, which some insects feed on. The White Mangrove has a small, dry, leathery, ribbed fruit. It contains dark red seeds and is buoyant, allowing it to float to new growing sites. Its flowers are greenish white and produce good honey. 1. PARKING - Parking of resident and guest vehicles is allowed from dawn until dusk. No overnight parking is allowed for vehicles of any kind, including recreational vehicles, boats and boat trailers. Buttonwood The Buttonwood is in the same family as the White Mangrove, but is often considered only an associate of mangroves. It is shrub-like along the shore and tree-like further inland. The button part of the name comes from the button-like appearance of the rounded flower heads that grow in branched clusters a ѡ)͠ɕɽչեи])ѡѡȁɽٕٔ́ɽ܁ͥєѡ()]٥ͥѥѡɬԁ䁍эͥ) ́ͽɥٕɡɽєѼ)ѕɼ 丁QéѥЁ́չ)ѡѠͱ՝Ёѡɬͥє) ф éѵЁѼѡɕ͕مѥ)ѡ́ͥє́٥ѡٕЁ)ѕɼ Aɬݡ́ݕѡq)]tѼɕչɉ)MѡЁԁ䁙ձ䁕ѕɼ Aɬ)ݔͬѡЁԁɔѼѡݥѕɼ) Aɬձ́ɕձѥ((ȸ$==9 YI])ѡɬɕȁѡЁɕ)ɔЁɵѕɥ́ɔɽ٥)ȁи]ͬѡЁɥ́)ѡɽɥєɅ͠ɕх)ͽѕ́ɕٕ) ́ѡɕͥ䁽ѡ͕ȸ)%ٕɅ́ɔѼ͕ٕ)ѡͽȁѡٕЁݥյձ)ɕͥ(̸$IMIYQ%=9LQA٥ݥ)ȁɕͥЁ͔ɕձȁ̸ͥ)!ݕٕȰɕ͕مѥ́ȁѡA٥)ȁٕ́ݥѕ)ЁЁ͕ٕͥ́ݥѠѡ)ѥѡI͕مѥɴ)QѥɔɬЁɕ͕ٕ)չѥɑȁѼ)مѼѡɕѕЁյȁ()܁܁ܸЁÍЁ̀((((0