Pinal County JLUS Final Report - Page 32

  Noise Due to the training that occurs at FMR, only small arms noise contours have been  modeled.  Small arms weapons typically refer to hand‐held and easily portable weapons  of .50 caliber or less that are primarily used against personnel and lightly armored or  unarmored equipment.  The Small Arms Range Noise Assessment Model is the computer  program used by the Army to model small arms noise zones.  It uses the peak noise level  and incorporates the most up‐to‐date information available on weapons noise source  models, sound propagation, ricochet barriers, noise mitigation and safety structures, and  the direction weapons are fired to create the noise zones.    The noise zones that were modeled for FMR represent a maximum small arms training  scenario where all ranges are actively firing.  This event is unlikely to occur due to the  overlap of some ranges and their associated safety zones.  However, there are also  individual events where noise generated is louder than the model that is generated  based on an average.  Noise Zone III falls entirely within the boundary of FMR.  Noise  Zone II extends outside the boundary for approximately 4,000 feet to the east, 2,300 feet  to the south, and 3,700 feet to the west.  However, there is currently minimal  development in this area, and there are very few noise‐sensitive uses.  The noise zones  are illustrated on Figure 2.  Safety Weapon Surface Danger Zones  A surface danger zone (SDZ) is an area around a weapons firing range from which the  access of all military personnel and civilians is restricted due to the inherent dangers  associated with the firing of live munitions.  An SDZ can include the surface (and  subsurface) of land and water, as well as the air space overhead through which  projectiles are launched.  An SDZ includes the weapons firing position, the target   impact area, and a secondary buffer area, which is an additional distance where errant  projectile / munitions fragments may land without risking harm to life or property.   Surface danger zones vary in size and shape depending on the type of weapon(s) fired,  their firing location, and the projectile trajectory.  Each of the firing ranges at FMR has an associated SDZ based on the type of weapons  fired at that range.  For simplicity, the SDZs are initially modeled on a 2‐dimensional  plane.  Some of the 2‐dimensional SDZs at FMR extend outside the installation’s  boundary onto privately‐owned land.  For this reason, the AZARNG has modeled  3‐dimensional SDZs that consider the terrain around these ranges.  When terrain features     14   Arizona Army National Guard Profile