Outdoor Insider Fall 2015 - Page 6

A Balancing Act The OAC’s design sought to thread the needle and take the best characteristics on each side. Where conflicts existed, priority was devoted to balancing the two, leading to a better overall result. Below are examples of operational challenges that needed to be taken into consideration. Climbing Center Focus • Prioritize route-setting • Maximize social space • Innovatively combine technical teaching elements • Climbing hold investment annual expenses are set aside to continually invest in new holds, allowing for the ability to retire holds as they age • Planning for route-setting budget incorporates expenses to fund turnover of routes and boulder problems • Front-line staff seen as the critical component in effective risk management. • Staff are seen as the conduit of culture. Architectural Feature Focus • ”Wow” factor that serves as a fixture on campus tours, often at the expense of programming • Streamlined operations & maintenance line. • At best, facility might require annual maintenance and/or cleaning. • Staff are present to grant entry and ensure policy compliance. stakeholders support its existence? The response to this question can be quite nuanced, but the vision it casts can ultimately define the space’s ethos, which will largely define the potential interest in and users of your facility. Potential answers to “why?” can fall somewhere along a spectrum. On one side, the space is seen as an architectural fixture, a component of a facility used to draw attention or make a statement. On the other end of the spectrum is a climbing center, where purposeful thought is devoted to facilitating connections between climbers to their larger community, and ultimately retaining active climbers. Construction Phase “Blueprints serve as a poor medium to convey context. The programmer must ensure that the facility’s vision translates from the sales and design teams to the crew of welders on site.” Establishing a solid and objective vision for the space is critical in design and operation. However, it is easy to overlook the challenge that awaits in the construction phase. The sheer number of individuals, offices, and stakeholders involved grows dramatically once designs are approved. The complexity of communication grows exponentially, and an undefined vision for the project will add a layer of challenge as hopes for the space get drafted into 2-D engineered drawings. Blueprints serve as a poor medium to convey context. The programmer must ensure that the facility’s vision translates from the sales and design tea