O'Fallon Weekly September 19, 2018

Scott Air Force Base leadship reflects upon September 11 Page 6 Appellate Court Judge David Overstreet speaks to O’Fallon Rotary Club Wednesday September 19, 2018 Vol. 4, No. 22 $1.00 Council sends investment proposal back to committee amid questions By Martha Stoffel Weekly Reporter Club President Woody Almind (right) thanks Appellate Court Judge David Overstreet for speaking Monday at the Rotary Club of O'Fallon meeting. (O'Fallon Weekly Photo by Annabelle Knef) By Annabelle Knef Weekly Reporter O'FALLON - Members of the Rotary Club of O’Fallon were given an inside glimpse into the Illinois Appellate Court by Judge David Overstreet on Monday.  Overstreet is a judge in the Fifth Appellate District of Mt. Vernon. He also currently serves on the Supreme Cou- rt strategic planning committee. Overstreet is also fellow Rotarian, a member of the Mt. Vernon club.  “It’s wonderful to be here and it’s a privilege to serve you as one of your fifth district appellate judges,” Over- street said. Overstreet was a circuit judge for ten years in the se- cond judicial circuit before he was assigned to the appella- te court for the last year and a half. Overstreet described the appellate court as the “interme- diate court of review.” See “Overstreet” on page 8 In This Edition Calendar................................................. 2 News................................................... 3-8 Law & Order........................................... 9 Education.......................................... 10-11 Health & Wellness.............................. 12-13 Sports............................................... 14-17 Milestones......................................... 18-19 Vanage Point......................................... 20 Lifestyle..................................................21 Fun & Games......................................... 22 Marketplace.......................................... 23 Bon Appétit........................................... 24 O'FALLON - The city’s updated in- vestment policy is headed back to the Finance & Administration Committee one more time, after the Council de- cided a few, minor changes were still needed before a second reading. City staff was recommending an update to the policy to align it with state statutes and more clearly define the policies and procedures of the ci- ty’s investments. The city is planning to issue requests for proposals (RFPs) soon for banking/financial services and investing services, and it was recommended to update the policy to potentially get more favorable rates. Staff is also proposing RFPs to be reviewed by an advisory investment committee to make recommendations to the city council. The motion to return the ordinance to committee was made by Alder- man Matthew Gilreath, seconded by Alderman Jerry Albrecht and was approved by a vote of 11-2. Voting against the motion were Aldermen Rich Meile and Andrew Lopinot. Alderman Mark Morton was absent. Alderman Dan Witt, a member of the Finance Committee, stated he felt it would be a good idea to go back to the committee with “new suggestions from tonight, and give everybody a chance to read it (the policy) then bring it back.” The question was raised again as Mayor Herb Roach issued a proclamation declaring September 17-23, 2018 as Constitution Week. Members of the Looking Glass Prairie Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution chapter were on hand to receive the proclamation. (O'Fallon Weekly Photo by Martha Stoffel) far as a timeline to get the new policy approved, and city staff indicated waiting an additional two weeks for the committee and city council meetings would not be an issue. A timeline because of CDs set to expire in December was noted at a previous meeting. An amended policy will be reviewed and discussed at the next Finance & Administration Committee meeting, to be held Monday, Septem- ber 24 at 7 p.m. at City Hall. In other council news: See “Council” on page 8 Lebanon receives 2017-18 Fiscal Year Audit Report By Annabelle Knef Weekly Reporter A financial audit of the city of Lebanon shows that assets exceed its liabilities by $10.3 million According to an annual audit pro- vided by outside auditor C.J. Schlo- sser & Co. on Aug. 10, the largest portion of the city's net assets reflects investment in capital assets, such as land, buildings, machinery, equip- ment and infrastructure, minus any debt to acquire them.  The report analyzes the city's posi- tion through the end of the fiscal year, April 30, and shows that the city's net position increased $409,580 over fiscal year 2017. It further states that current assets - cash, investments and accounts receivable - increased $157,908 over last year. Current liabilities, which include accounts payable, advance payments for water and sewer tap deposits and customer deposits, decreased $48,731, the report states. Also, long- -term liabilities were down $364,701, "primarily" because of a decrease in the net pension liability and the retire- ment of debt. Total revenues decreased $377,148 for the year ending April 30, which the report attributes to lower repor- ted capital grant contributions for payments the state made on capital projects in the city. For instance, in 2017, capital grants and contribution revenue was $518,419, compared to $58,551 in 2018.  However, property tax and sales and use tax both increased in 2018 over 2017. Property tax revenues in 2018 were $290,454, compared to $284,260 in 2017. Sales and use tax in 2018 were $621,937, compared to $602,439 in 2017. The city increased expenses in governmental activities by $235,854 - the largest category of expense being public safety, according to the report. In 2018, the city spent $2,207,913 on governmental activities; in 2017, it spent $1,972,059.