O'Fallon Weekly December 19, 2018

Wednesday December 19, 2018 O'Fallon PD welcomes Santa at annual breakfast Page 13 Candidates file to run in April election By Nick Miller Weekly Editor The makeup of the ballot for the April 2, 2019, elec- tion has come into focus following Monday’s deadline for individuals in- terested in running for office to file their necessary paperwork. In O’Fallon, all but two City Coun- cil seats will see a contested race take place. In Ward 1, Den- nis Muyleart, who ran in 2017, will take on Jessica Gunther and Catherine McBride in one of the two three-way races taking place in the city. Over in Ward 2, incumbent Bob Kueker is being challen- ged by Jessica Lotz. Incumbent Ward 3 Alderman Kevin Hagarty is running unopposed for re-election to another four year term. Ward 4 will see the other three-way race in the April elec- tion. Mary Lynam-Miller, Sarah Atterberry, and Todd Roach, who is the son of Mayor Herb Roach, will take each other on for the position. Ward 5 has both seats up for election, one for a full four- -year term and one for a shortened two year term. For the four year position, former O’Fallon Alderman Chris Hursey will challenge Gwendolyn Randolph, who was appointed to the City Council by Mayor Roach when Alderwoman Courtney Marsh resigned after moving out of the ward. Former Central School District 104 Board of Education Member Chris Monroe has filed to run for the two year posi- tion. Monroe is unopposed. Election 2019 See “Election 2018” on page 7 In This Edition Calendar................................................. 2 News................................................... 3-7 Law & Order........................................... 8 Education................................................ 9 Health & Wellness ����������������������������������10 Sports............................................... 11-12 Community........................................ 13-14 Milestones..............................................15 Vantage Point.........................................16 Lifestyle..................................................17 Fun & Games..........................................18 Marketplace...........................................19 Bon Appétit........................................... 20 Vol. 4, No. 35 $1.00 Man arrested following shooting at St. Clair Bowl By Nick Miller Weekly Editor O'FALLON - A suspect is in custo- dy and has been charged with four felonies following a shooting that took place at St. Clair Bowl on Wednesday, December 12. According to the O’Fallon Police Department, at approximately 10:48 p.m. the police responded to St. Clair Bowl, located at 5950 Old Collinsville Road, in regard to a shots fired call. Upon arrival, investigating offi- cers discovered that one subject had been shot inside the upstairs bar area. The victim was transported to St. Elizabeth’s Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The O’Fallon Police Department began a search for the suspect in the area surrounding the bowling alley after assessing the situation. With the aid of numerous metro-east law enforcement agencies including Fairview Heights Police, St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department, Shiloh Police Department, Troy Police De- See “Shooting” on page 7 Brian Pinion, 27, of Fairview Heights Central 104 civil rights lawsuit is headed for a jury trial By Angela Simmons Weekly Reporter O'FALLON - Central School District 104’s Board of Education is one of five defendants that is slated for a trial by jury in a federal civil rights lawsuit filed by former district coaches and parents of former district students. The lawsuit, filed in January 2018, names the District 104 school board, School Board President Sarah Svobo- da, current teacher Derek Morgan, and former teachers Andrea Heuring and Emily Weber as defendants in the 28 count lawsuit that alleges discriminati- on, retaliation, and violation of several state and federal policies, and dam- ages that total in excess of $2 million. The now 28-count lawsuit filed by Attorney Mark Schuver, stems from multiple district incidents, most notably, the January 2017 incident where Heuring allegedly called two mixed race students “slaves.” The boy and girl were dubbed “Slave one” and “Slave four,” and were then allegedly told to perform several tasks for the teacher, including fetching her coat because she was cold. The students, who have African-American fathers and Caucasian mothers, reported the incident to their parents immediately. Their parents, Theo and Stephanie Afogho and Todd and Krista Porter, spoke out at school board meetings following the incident in an attempt to get answers and apologies from the teacher and district for what had hap- pened to their children. The Afoghos and Todd Porter are listed as plaintiffs in the lawsuit. Basketball coaches Marcus Gregory and Christopher Boykin, also plainti- ffs, also spoke out at meetings about not only the January incident, but the problematic “culture” in the district. Gregory often came to meetings prepared with statistics, including one where he stated that 49 percent of the district’s students at that time were African American, but there was not one African American teacher or administrator, an issue that the district amended in the following months. At the February 13, 2017, regular board meeting, the parents made the public aware of the continued suffe- ring of their children and demanded to now why no action had been taken by the district. After a closed session, Svoboda read a statement that thanked attendees for all of their input, and noted that Superintendent John Bute would be holding a summit to address the issues. Just three days later, the board called an emergency meeting and Svoboda read a prepared apology statement. “We would like to begin by letting everyone know that our lack of an immediate response on Monday night was not due to our lack of concern, or our desire to respond, rather it was so we could discuss this at length as a board, determine the most appropriate course of action, and exercise due diligence before providing a unified response. To the families, and particu- larly the children involved, we wish to extend a sincere apologies [sic] for the comments that were made to you. In no way do those remarks reflect the beliefs of this district. We thank you for bringing this very important matter to our attention, and we want you to know that we are committed to doing everything we can to prevent this from happening again in the future,” she said. Several O’Fallon Township High School students attended the Februa- ry 16 emergency meeting, and the lawsuit mentions that they were rallied by Heuring. In an answer to the first amended complaint, filed on July 24 by Heuring’s lawyer Kevin E. Myers of the Law Offices of Rouse and Cary, Heuring admits to contacting a student via Facebook message, and admits that after the student asked what Heu- ring needed them to do, she responded by sending the message “I don't know if it's the right thing or not, but can you be there tomorrow night? Can you rally any and all JAMS students that's know [sic] that I'm not the monster they are portraying me to be?" In the same answer, in paragraph 54, Heuring then contradicts her admitted See “Central Lawsuit” on page 6