O'Fallon Weekly August 15, 2018

Southview Plaza demolition planned but facing delay Page 4 O'Fallon Station construction on schedule, to open in early November By Martha Stoffel Weekly Reporter O'FALLON - During Monday evening’s City Council Parks and Environment Committee meeting, an upda- te was given regarding the ongoing construction of the O’Fallon Station. Mary Jeanne Hutchison, Director of Parks & Recreati- on, said the steel arrived Monday and framing will begin on the pavilion structure. Curbing work has been on-go- ing, and they are hopeful to begin paving the road and parking in three weeks. The project is currently on schedule, with a tentative completion date of November 1. “Curbing should be done in the next two weeks or so. We’re working on the north side now, then the curbing around the Scale House, which was a change order becau- se it wasn’t planned for,” Hutchison said. “Our plan is to be paving in the next three weeks. We’ll be able to have the pavement for the road and the parking done and then we’ll fence off the area as they erect the building.” A kickoff event is tentatively being planned for the November 8 or 9, with a ticketed fundraising event after its opening. “We’re working on about six weeks of programming. Its kind of iffy and scary to plan stuff right now, but we’re planning to have a ribbon cutting on the 8th or 9th,” Hut- chison said. She said that staff is planning for Christmas events and working with the Chamber of Commerce for events in coordination with the downtown businesses. In other business… The Committee discussed an updated Parks Animal Control Ordinance. See “Parks Committee” on page 8 In This Edition Calendar................................................. 2 News................................................... 3-8 Business..............................................9-10 Law & Order..........................................11 Sports....................................................12 Milestones......................................... 13-14 Vanage Point..........................................15 Health & Wellness.............................. 16-17 Fun & Games..........................................18 Lifestyle..................................................19 Marketplace.......................................... 20 Legal Notices..................................... 21-60 Wednesday August 15, 2018 Vol. 4, No. 17 $1.00 O'Fallon's newest city council member embracing new role By Annabelle Knef Weekly Reporter The newest member of the O’Fallon City Council, Ward 5 Alderwoman Gwendolyn Randolph, is embracing her new role and diving deep into the inner workings of the city. Sworn into office on August 6, Randolph was appointed as alderwo- man by Mayor Herb Roach to replace Courtney Marsh, who stepped down from the council after she moved out of her ward. Randolph said that it’s very exciting being appointed to the council and that “historically it is monumental.” “I’m really here to do the best job that I can for my constituents and for the city of O’Fallon,” Randolph said. Randolph said that she heard about the council opening at a recent town- ship meeting. “I went home and thought about it because every community I have lived in I’ve always been very active so I thought this is a great way to really get to know my neighbors better and my community and to serve,” she said. Randolph said that in the week she has been in her position, she has been meeting a lot of people and also reading through old archives “to try to get a knowledge base so I could know how to best serve.” Randolph will serve on two city committees: Public Works and Public Safety. “I have a criminal justice bac- kground so public safety is huge for me. One thing about where I live - I feel very safe,” she said. “I think O’Fallon has done a great job and I want to help sustain those things that are already in place.” See “Randolph” on page 4 Lebanon being considered for site of film production By Annabelle Knef Weekly Reporter LEBANON - California-based produ- cer Andrew Jones spoke to Lebanon officials and Illinois South Tourism members on Monday about producing a movie in the area. Jones said that his film is called Harriet Houdini and is about a teenage girl who is “very shy” and has a “love of magic.” He also said that it’s a “feel good” family film and tackles themes such as anti-bullying and female empowerment. “The film takes place in a small mid- western town so I’m looking for a place that is very picturesque,” Jones said. Some of the locations that would be featured in the film are a main street, a farm house, a magic shop, a diner and an auditorium. “Budget wise, we tend not to build much,” he said. Jones said that filming in Lebanon would offer a fun opportunity for local actors to be a part of the movie. He also expressed how filming in small towns is “really good for tourism.” Jones said that one thing he wou- ld need from the city of Lebanon is support - both financial support and community support. “It’s harder and harder to get funding for these movies.” Jones said that what is unique about this film is that it’s set up as a non-profit See “Film” on page 4 Central 104 Board of Education allows students to attend District 90 schools By Nick Miller Weekly Editor O'FALLON - The Central 104 Board of Education approved a resolution Monday evening allowing residents living on Carnegie Knolls Road, a road attached to the subdivision Parcs of Arbor Green, to send their children to District 90 schools even though they reside in the Central School District. The resolution will allow the four students impacted by the boundary issue to attend District 90 schools for one year while the residents of Carnegie Knolls Road appeal to the Regional Office of Education to have their homes perma nently listed within District 90 boundaries. At the July District 90 Board of Education meeting, it was announced by Superintendent Carrie Hruby that four students who reside on Carnegie Knolls Road were mistakenly regis- tered and should have been attending Central District 104 schools based on the zoning of the neighborhood.  At the meeting, Hruby said an in- tergovernmental agreement was made between the two districts to allow the four students to continue to attend District 90 schools for the 2018-19 school year. However, the resolution adopted by District 90 was different than the one originally approved by the Central 104 Board at their July meeting, resulting in the need for the Central Board to address the issue again at Monday’s meeting. “Central School District 104 provi- des a quality education for all students in our district. We look forward to the opportunity to demonstrate how we can serve the needs of all students See “Central 104” on page 8