NYU Black Renaissance Noire Winter 2014 - Page 27

kk Untitled 5, 1986 Archival Ink Jet Print on Canson Platine Fiber Rag 14 x 14 inches By the early nineteenth century, New Orleans had grown, and the City wished to extend Tremé Street, but the cemetery, particularly the Protestant Section, was in the way. Furthermore, with the Louisiana Purchase and impending Louisiana statehood, the city had experienced an influx of Americans, the majority of whom were Protestant. To remedy these issues, in 1822 the City proffered a site in the Faubourg St. Marie to be used as a Protestant burial ground, later known as Girod Street Cemetery. 25 Due to its location in a swamp, St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 was constantly threatened by flooding. To combat the rising waters, sand and shells were continuously added to the site, particularly along the pathways. In 1816, the waters of Macarty Crevasse flooded the cemetery to the extent that the site was closed, and burials took place across the river. BLACK RENAISSANCE NOIRE o Untitled 6, 2007 Archival Ink Jet Print on Canson Platine Fiber Rag 14 x 14 inches