NYU Black Renaissance Noire Winter 2014 - Page 192

L ———————————————— q13) 1944 ————————————————— Caliphate ideology and Agenda — Section A L———————————————— — 1948, Alhaji Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, parliamentary leader of the Northern Peoples’ Congress (npc), during the budget session of the Nigerian Legislative council. {18 Coleman, Nigeria: Background to Nationalism, p. 361} L———————————————— ———————————————— q14) 1948 “Since 1914 the British Government has been trying to make Nigeria into one country, but the Nigeria people themselves are historically different in their background, in their religious beliefs and customs and do not show themselves any sign of willingness to unite…. Nigerian unity is only a British intention for the country.” 17 — 1948, Alhaji Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, parliamentary leader of the Northern Peoples’ Congress (npc), during a session of the Nigerian Legislative council. {17 Coleman, Nigeria: Background to Nationalism, p. 320} L———————————————— L———————————————— As pointed out earlier, in 1960, the Sarduana of Sokoto stated his Nigeria Project thus: [see q1, above] ————————————————— [Back to quotes from Tony Nwaezeigwe, “Ethnicity and the Politics of Igbo, Yoruba Relations: Case of a Celebration of Defeat?”] L L “Holding this country together is not possible except by means of the religion of the Prophet. If they want political unity let them follow our religion.” 15 — 1942, the conference of Northern Chiefs in response to a letter from the ukbased West African Students’ Union (wasu) to the Northern Emirs asking them to support the constitutional evolution of Nigeria into a full independent nation. {15 Quoted from Obafemi Awolowo, Path to Nigerian Freedom, London: Faber and Faber, 1947, p. 51.} “Many (Nigerians) deceive themselves by thinking that Nigeria is one,…particularly some of the press people…This is wrong. I am sorry to say that this presence of Unity is artificial and it ends outside this Chamber… The Southern tribes who are now pouring into the North in ever increasing numbers, and are more or less domiciled here do not mix with the Northern people…and we in the North look upon them as invaders.” 18 L ———————————————— q12) 1942 ———————————————— q15) 1948 “Those Southerners who desire a United Nigeria should first embrace Islam as their religion.” 16 — 1944, the Sultan of Sokoto responding to a delegation from wasu that paid him a visit to plead for his support for the memorandum on constitutional reform. {16 James Coleman, Nigeria : Background to Nationalism, Los Angeles and London: University of California, Berkeley, 1971, p. 361.} L———————————————— [Quotes from Tony Nwaezeigwe, “Ethnicity and the Politics of Igbo, Yoruba Relations: Case of a Celebration of Defeat?”, Department of Political Science University of Lagos: Special Lecture Series 2, October 1998, pp. 5-8.] L He was very worried as to what would happen when the British shall have gone. He was not sure of what would keep the diverse peoples together within the artificial boundaries drawn on the map in the 1880s and 1890s. (p.306) ———————————————— q16) Today, it is no longer a matter of debate that the Hausa-Fulani ruling oligarchy of this country has the sole objective of remaining the hereditary rulers of Nigeria. A far-reaching revelation in this regard is summed up in the words of one of the most respected members of the group: [see q3 above] 190 — Nwaezeigwe, p. 8 L————————————————