NYU Black Renaissance Noire Winter 2014 - Page 132

130 The structure of the 19th Gothic novel typically situates the female heroine in a position of vulnerability and victimization. But, certain female protagonists such as Lady Audley from Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s “Lady Audley’s Secret”, Bertha from Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre”, Zola’s “Therese Raquin”, Wilkie Collin’s “The Woman in White”, and the woman in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper” to name a few, were exceptions. These heroines gained agency by going insane, as it was a way for them to escape ennui or misery from extreme powerlessness and wreck havoc while doing so. q Therese Raquin, 2011 (by Zola), Acrylic and digital photographs on fabric on board 46 x 36 inches m Lady Audley, 2011 (from Lady Audley’s Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon) Acrylic and digital photographs on fabric on board 40 x 32 inches ll Emily Dickinson, 2012 (Much Madness is Divinest Sense) Acrylic and digital photographs on fabric on board 20 x 16 inches