NTX Magazine Volume 4 - Page 40

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT Transportation could be moving passengers by 2020. The region’s relatively flat geography and far distance between the two cities are ideal for this kind of rail development. To identify the ideal path for a high-speed rail line, the company studied 97 city pairs before choosing the Dallas and Houston corridor. Environmental impact studies are currently underway, led by the Federal Railroad Administration and the Texas Department of Transportation. Once construction has officially started, the project will take approximately four years to complete. In Japan today, this fifth-generation high-speed rail technology operates daily, moving thousands “ Not only will high-speed rail significantly reduce travel times and traffic congestion for Dallas and Houston area residents, but it will also create new, high-paying jobs and stimulate economic growth.” –Hon. Mike Rawlings, Dallas Mayor and more efficient than automobile emissions from separate travelers. Earlier this year, the mayors of Houston, Dallas and Fort Worth announced their public support for the Texas high-speed rail project, praising the company for providing a faster alternative and tackling growing traffic concerns. This would be faster than any train operating in the U.S. “This innovative project is a game changer for transportation between the two engines that drive around the country with a proven safety record of zero accident-related fatalities. TCR plans to deploy an updated version of the N700 bullet train that will reach a maximum speed of 205 mph with an annual average delay of less than one minute. Careful attention is being paid toward conservation in the planning of this new transportation option. Land conservation is considered in the planning process. Texas Central Railway will have its own dedicated tracks along existing rights-of-way in order to minimize the need to acquire additional land. The bullet train is also considered a more “green” travel option, with the train emitting only a fraction of the carbon dioxide emissions of a Boeing 737 plane job creation throughout Texas,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said. “Not only will high-speed rail significantly reduce travel times and traffic congestion for Dallas and Houston area residents, but it will also create new, high-paying jobs and stimulate economic growth.” Other Texas cities, including Austin and San Antonio, are working with the U.S. Department of Transportation to plan their own connections to what can become the nation’s first high-speed rail network. “Texas will be the leader in this new American industry,” Eckels said. “Two of America’s urban economic powerhouses will have a new safe, fast and reliable connection to help secure Texas’s long-term prosperity.” Houston cityscape. ©iStock.com/Davel5957 38 www.ntc-dfw.org Winter/Spring 2015