News From Native California Volume 31, Issue 3 - Page 48

By Sabine Nicole Talaugon i have recurring dreams about places, most often places on the coast of California, from Monterey down to Santa Barbara. In these dreams, I am traveling to these places, first unknowingly and then with an excited sense that I know where I am and where I am going. One of these places is inland from where I grew up, but a place I had never physically seen. In my dreams about this place, I travel through the hills for a while, then the hills begin to flatten until I am on a plain, and as I go up one last small hill and around a bend I know that water will meet me at the road, and that this water is healing to the blood in my body that carries the memories of my ancestors. This place is Soda Lake, on the Carrizo Plain. I recently started working on exhibit research for my family’s cultural center in Guadalupe. This research is cen- tered around recognizing indigenous knowledge as special- ized, complex, and necessary for the survival of both natu- ral resources and people on indigenous lands. The project grows from my grandfather’s work on a Chumash arbor- glyph, a tree carving on a private ranch in the Santa Lucia Range of San Luis Obispo County. This work recognized that the arborglyph and similar motifs found among Chu- mash and Yokuts pictographs are maps of the stars used by the original astronomers. Prior to this work, many anthro- pologists believed these images were simply the result of hal- lucinogenic experiences. While we no longer have access to the arborglyph that started our family’s commitment to this 46 β–Ό N E WS F ROM N AT IVE C AL IFO RNIA work, similar motifs can be found at Painted Rock in Carrizo Plain National Monument. In April of last year, the Trump administration threatened to eliminate and revoke the status of dozens of national monuments, including Carrizo Plain, a sacred site for Chu- mash, Salinan, and Yokuts people, and home to one of the highest concentrations of rare, threatened, and endangered species found in the continental United States. Thanks to the work of many, Carrizo Plain has maintained its status as a national monument. The d …䁉•™½Ι”$±•™Π™½Θ …ΙΙ₯鼁A±…₯Έ°΅δΙ…Ή‘Α„Ρ½±)΅”Ρ‘…ЁA…₯ΉΡ•I½¬έ…́„…Ρ‘•Ι₯ΉœΑ±…”™½ΘΡ‘”9…Ρ₯Ω”)Α•½Α±”½˜Ρ‘”Ι•₯½ΈΈ%Ё݅́„Ν…Ή‘ΝΡ½Ή”…΅Α‘₯Ρ‘•…Ρ•Θ°Ρ…±°)…ΉT΅Ν‘…Α•έ₯Ρ „™±…Ё…Ι•„…Ёё”Ρ½ΐ‘₯Ι•Ρ±δ…Ι½Ν́™Ι½΄)Ρ‘”½Α•Ή₯Ήœέ‘•Ι”„ΝΑ•…­•Θ½Υ±ΝΡ…Ή…Ή‰”‘•…ɐ‰δ)±₯ΝΡ•Ή•Ί™…ȁ…݅丁!”Ν…₯‘”έ₯Ν‘•‘”½Υ±Όέ₯Ρ ΅”°)‰ΥЁё…Ёё”‘₯­”έ½Υ±‰”Ρ½Ό΅Υ °ΝΌ‘”…Ν­•΅”ΡΌΡ…­”)Ν½΅”Α₯ΡΥΙ•ΜΈ́$ΑΙ•Α…Ι•™½ΘΡ‘”ΡΙ₯ΐΡ‘…ЁΉ₯‘Π°$Ι•…±₯镐)Ρ‘…Ё΅δ‘₯™™₯Υ±Π΅ΡΌ΅Ι•Α±…”…΅•Ι„‰…ΡΡ•Ιδέ…́΅₯ΝΝ₯ΉœΈ$™•±Π)Ν₯΅Υ±Ρ…Ή•½Υͱ䁍½΅΅₯ΡΡ•ΡΌΝ½±Ω₯ΉœΡ‘₯́ΑΙ½‰±•΄…ΉΥ₯±Ρδ)Ρ‘…Ёё₯́݅́ΑΙ½‰…‰±δ„Ν₯ΈΡ‘…Ё$Ν‘½Υ±Ή½Π‰Ι₯Ήœ„…΅•Ι„)ΡΌ„Ν…Ι•Ν₯Ρ”…Ё…±°Έ ΥЁё•Έ$έ…́ɕ΅₯Ή‘•½˜„½ΉΩ•Θ΄)Ν…Ρ₯½Έ$‘…έ₯Ρ „™Ι₯•ΉΈ$Ρ½±‘•ΘΡ‘…Ёё₯́ΑΙ½©•Πέ…́„)±•…ΐ½ΥЁ½˜΅δ½΅™½ΙЁ齹”…Ή$έ…͍́…Ι•ΈM‘”Ρ½±΅”)ΡΌ½ΉΝ₯‘•Θ‘½άΝ½΅•Ρ₯΅•Με½Τ…Έ‘…Ή”ε½ΥȁΑ•ΙΝΑ•Œ΄)Ρ₯Ω”©ΥΝЁ„±₯ΡΡ±”‰₯ЁͼΡ‘…Ёݽɬε½Τ…Ι”Ν…Ι•½˜‰•½΅•Μ)Ν…Ι•έ½Ι¬ΈΩ•ΈΡ‘½Υ $έ½ΙΙ₯•…‰½ΥЁ΅₯Μ΅ΝΡ•ΑΑ₯Ήœ½