Networks Europe Issue 19 January/February 2019 - Page 32

32 MICRO DATA CENTRES "Some micro data centres, especially those of larger capacity, will require a three phase UPS output. This can be delivered by any number of systems offering power ratings up to 50kVA per unit" For a more modular solution, compact tower configurations are available. They can be populated with multiple UPS boards, and support N+1 redundancy. There are also 19in rack-mounted options available through several suppliers. Either configuration can be scaled, incrementally and cost-effectively, simply by adding UPS boards as the critical load increases. There are also compact, reliable systems for micro data centres requiring a single-phase supply of higher power. These types of UPS systems can offer single or three-phase input from single or dual power sources, with capacities of up to 20kVA capacity with the option to parallel multiple units to provide up to 80kVA or 60kVA with N+1 redundancy. Other options to consider are in your selection process should include tools such as built-in humidity and temperature sensors, and network connectivity, which allows the UPS’s health to be monitored in real-time, and alarms to be detected immediately. Some micro data centres, especially those of larger capacity, will require a three-phase UPS output. This can be delivered by any number of systems offering power ratings up to 50kVA per unit, and various cabinet sizes to accommodate different choices of battery capacity. Up to 20 units can often be paralleled, either to increase capacity or to add redundancy for minimising downtime. Extended battery autonomy can be provided by adding stylistically- matched battery cabinets. This type of UPS’s transformerless design, together with Energy Saving Inverter Switching (ESIS), technology, enable efficiencies of up to 95.5%to be realised by some suppliers; a level that drastically reduces the UPS’s total cost of ownership. Today, even higher-capacity UPS can operate inside the confined space available within micro data centres and products can be found with a footprint of only 0.4m2 even at 50kVA, and a power density of up to 100kW/ m 2 . An important option An article published in IoT Sources in December 2017 highlights the large number of IoT growth projections now available. While many will be wrong, there’s an underlying trend of continued growth. The IoT is gaining momentum, the article says, in spite of the obstacles to implementation that still exist. This is a key driver of growth for micro data centres, but there are others, too. For example, Maurice F. Zetena III, VP of Data Centre Technology at Leviton, points out that they aren’t just an option for remote environments; they can also fulfil roles within mega data centres, acting as data collection points, for example. As micro data centres for these different applications can vary considerably in size, it’s important that their designers can access an equally varied range of UPS, all with the same performance, albeit scaled-down, as their traditional data centre counterparts. This article has endeavoured to show some possibilities that currently exist. n www.networkseuropemagazine.com