Network Communications News (NCN) May 2017 - Page 23

CLOUD COMPUTING & VIRTUALISATION Navigating the complex DX journey that cannot be virtualised and migrated to the cloud, combined with customers who rely on flawless and unceasing delivery of their digital services, are two very big challenges that need to be surmounted. Also to consider is governance, compliance and regulatory requirements across sectors, meaning that some digital assets must remain on-premises. The road ahead is complicated, more so than simply migrating infrastructure and applications to the cloud. So what needs to be done? Simply, the transition to cloud, along with DX as a whole, must be carefully monitored and managed so that continuation of service is not disrupted and the best business outcomes are assured. These business outcomes are measured by metrics such as the quality of customer experience, speed of new service innovation and business agility, which reflects the predictability and resiliency of delivering these services to the market. These business metrics are all interdependent and need to be delivered simultaneously. For example, without agility speed becomes irrelevant and quality unattainable. Without speed the business is doomed to fail, regardless of quality and agility. And finally without quality, speed and agility are both useless. The role of monitoring and managing the progress of DX initiatives falls squarely on the shoulders of the chief information officer, who must maintain order and lay the foundations for the future. With the change of pace quickening, the new technologies across the edge, core, data centre and cloud within the service delivery infrastructure, this is extremely true. These technologies, after all, are the foundation of the ‘Pillars of Innovation’ such as Big Data Analytics, cloud, XaaS, IoT, and many others. ‘The road ahead is complicated, more so than simply migrating infrastructure and applications to the cloud.’ These Pillars of Innovation deliver the right business service innovations that are needed for a perpetual and successful DX journey. The CIO is in an ideal position to oversee this. To select the right tool to assure a successful digital transformation of business, a number of criteria need to be met. It must manage complexity over time as it extends into a hybrid cloud environment. It also needs to scale easily and quickly for any number of services, or users, or even data. It needs to support the quality, speed and agility necessary in highly competitive environments, whilst enabling visualisation of information gathered in the context of a monitored business service. The above are not simple tasks in their own right, but, if this transition is managed properly, the benefits of hybrid cloud are huge. Enterprises can gain the agility to increase the capacity of their infrastructure with no additional capital expenses, quickly deploying new services in line with business need. Heads of lines of business, CIOs, IT operations personal; all will benefit from these important considerations as they are the ones that plan, manage, execute and are the champions of hybrid cloud initiatives. However, it is important to consider that in the process, enterprises risk losing visibility and control over the data and the quality of service delivery that they have gained through a variety of on-premises management platforms and operational procedures developed over the years. It is crucial that this risk is mitigated effectively and this will be key in giving organisations the confidence to migrate services to the cloud make hybrid cloud a key part of their ongoing infrastructure. Enterprises must remember that successful cloud based disruption is not only about delivering transformational customer and business services with speed. It is about delivering them with high quality and agility. In our increasingly connected world, assuring the quality of May 2017 | 23 CLOUD COMPUTING & VIRTUALISATION Navigating the complex DX journey ‘The road ahead is complicated, more so than simply migrating infrastructure and applications to the cloud.’ that cannot be vir tualised and migrated to the cloud, combined with customers who rely on flawless and unceasing delivery of their digital ser vices, are two very big challenges that need to be surmounted. Also to consider is governance, compliance and regulatory requirements across sectors, meaning that some digital assets must remain on-premises. The road ahead is complicated, more so than simply migrating infrastructure and applications to the cloud. So what needs to be done? Simply, the transition to cloud, along with DX as a whole, must be carefully monitored and managed so that continuation of service is not disrupted and the best business outcomes are assured. These business outcomes are measured by metrics such as the quality of customer experience, speed of new service innovation and business agility, which reflects the predictability and resiliency of delivering these services to the market. These business metrics are all interdependent and need to be delivered simultaneously. For example, without agility speed becomes irrelevant and quality unattainable. Without speed the business is doomed to fail, regardless of quality and agility. And finally without quality, speed and agility are both useless. The role of monitoring and managing the progress of DX initiatives falls squarely on the shoulders of the chief information officer, who must maintain order and lay the foundations for the future. With the change of pace quickening, the new technologies across the edge, core, data centre and cloud within the service delivery infrastructure, this is extremely true. These technologies, after all, are the foundation of the ‘Pillars of Innovation’ such as Big Data Analytics, cloud, XaaS, IoT, and many others. T h e se P i l l a r s of I n n ovati on d e l i ve r t h e r i g ht b u si n es s s er v i ce i n n ovat i o n s t h at a re n eeded for a p e r p et u a l a n d su cc es sf ul DX j o u r n e y . T h e C I O i s i n an i deal p o si t i o n to ove r se e t hi s . 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