National Paranormal Society NPS FOCUS June 2016 - Page 8

10. Biggest Paranormal Pet Peeve: I’m a big believer in “hands on” experience and communicating that in articles and/or training. Unfortunately, I see a lot of people write paranormal articles about locations, techniques or equipment they have never personally been to, never been trained on or never used in an investigation. In today’s internet world anyone can quickly look up and conduct “research” on any topic. For us “old” folks it really beats sifting through a card catalog at the library or weeding through the World Britannica editions… But too many people conduct internet research and spit out articles to support their opinions without firsthand experience. If you’ve taken the time to research online, go one step further: visit the location, get legitimate training from a proper source and use the equipment on your next investigation. Now, you’ve got a legitimate opportunity to share your research AND your firsthand experience.

Most people don’t realize that NPS Reps rotate through departments and write articles periodically. When they come to Resources to write or solicit a topic I always suggest writing about what you know personally and what you feel passionately about in the field. It almost guarantees and informed and worthwhile

contribution.

19. Suggestions for Investigators:

Everyone wants to catch that one piece of undeniable evidence. It’s part of the chase in the field and this has led down a slippery slope of buying the “ghost-hunting necessities.” In my opinion, I’ve spent a lot of money on equipment over the years, but I have been floored, and even jealous on occasion, with many teams and their vast array of “latest & greatest” investigative tools and gadgetry. So let me say this, chasing that piece of evidence and having the tools DO go hand in hand to some degree.

But PLEASE, recognize the most important tool for any investigation is your own

brain. If you spend the entire investigation looking through a 4 inch screen for something to be captured on film you’re not really taking in the entire environment. Equipment is a tool in the tool box, but don’t become so dependent on it you are not using your own senses and good ole common sense.

If you are looking for a team to investigate with, and possibly join, be sure and research local options and look for referrals. “Try out” a couple of groups and see which has a style that works with you. Don’t settle; find something that’s a good fit.

Contributors: Will Crawford

and Lillee Allee