National Paranormal Society NPS FOCUS June 2016 - Page 10

Team Interview

3 Towers Paranormal

The

Interview

For NPS Focus’ inaugural team interview, I had the pleasure of speaking with Randy Dicks and Casey Deely of 3 Towers Paranormal, based in western Pennsylvania. 3 Towers takes their name and logo from the charter flag of the city of Pittsburgh. Mirroring this flag, 3 Towers stands on three principle traits: Rational, Confidential, and Professional. Though based in the Pittsburgh, PA area, 3 Towers investigates throughout the region and into neighboring states as well. Founded in 2010, there are nine members with two junior members. Their backgrounds range from human services to psychiatric nursing, jazz performance to technology and insurance to occupational therapy. All members are trained on all facets of the investigative process and all function as case managers at times, as well as analysis of potential evidence. Several members had previously belonged to other teams, but found 3 Towers to be a more rounded team and a better fit.

During our extensive interview, quickly turning

into a get-together truth be told, we discussed many aspects of the field of paranormal investigating. Like many teams, 3 Towers focuses on ghosts and hauntings/haunted locations. When asked how 3 Towers melds the varied skill sets of their members into a cohesive unit, Randy and Casey explained their membership process. Potential members tend to be referred to them by people they know. However, an application is required followed by an interview. Discussion on the team’s process and “what they are

about.” as well as the applicant’s background, personal beliefs, openness to other belief systems and equipment owned/used helps to give a feel for whether the applicant would be a good addition for this team. The next step is to participate as a guest investigator on a case, and then possibly a trial member. Through this process it becomes evident whether this person would be an asset to the team. Often potential members fall off or are referred elsewhere should it seem that they are not a strong fit.