May 2018 smartGOV_eMagazine_May2018 - Page 3

Editorial Smart Governance Jay P Gupta Cyber security: Concerns clear but nobody listening T his May issue is before you a bit delayed and it is not owing to absence of manpower or any other financial hiccups rather it was the technological snag in our system that left us crying for over one month and delayed the final roll out of May edition. All our back up data was hacked and files got corrupted forcing us to restart our processes. Technology is more vulnerable than ever to external attack. It is disturbing that a heart pacemaker, a dam, the grid supplying power to a city or even a traffic system is open to hacking. Companies at the cutting edge of technology are neck deep in cyber security threat assessment and damage control. By 2020 the Internet of Things is on route to connect 200 billion objects, and that includes you and me, our pets and all the technological marvels that make our lives easier. Software is everywhere, but it’s also prone to failure and attacks, leaving us vulnerable. If the battery on your smartphone runs out you realize how helpless you are without your contacts, social media and GPS. To avoid undesirable consequences, we must maintain 24/7 access to technology, upgrade our software, and firewall personal information. Ethical hackers are disappointed that growing technological innovation is not creating secure homes and safer work-spaces. Glitches and problems we’d solved and buried are resurfacing. The more innovative we are, the more insecure we become. Technology is more vulnerable than ever to external attack. It is disturbing that a heart pacemaker, a dam, the grid supplying power to a city or even a traffic system is open to hacking. Companies at the cutting edge of technology are neck deep in cyber security threat assessment and damage control. In businesses that are aware of growing cyber security problems and privacy issues, an astonishing 70% of device communication remains unencrypted. It appears that the cyber security threat is a three-headed serpent. First, cyber security issues remain within the domain of engineers and software pros. Other employees know nothing or have no idea what to do. Second, many layers of technology (old, obsolete and new) exist in an organization, and patching updates to the new systems don’t resolve vulnerability of older systems. Third, companies are not prioritizing time, money and personnel for cyber security because they remain focused By 2020 the Internet of Things is on route to connect 200 billion objects, and that includes you and me, our pets and all the technological marvels that make our lives easier. on the production line, and bottom line. All technological innovations come with their own set of “side-effects” for it is difficult to have the yin without the yang. The advent of the digital age and computer integration in all forms of data storage and analysis has resulted in digital information being valued at a higher pedigree than gold itself. This has given rise to the phenomenon of cyber security and the adjoining paraphernalia with it being a factor in day to day digital interaction. These unwanted features that accompany progress is a challenge that every inventor and innovator should be able to tackle to ensure the optimum application of the technology.  paruwala@gmail.com | governancesmart@gmail.com 3 | May 2018 | www.smartgovernance.in