Marketing For The Future November 2016 - Page 20

security in the main streets, 5) their sense of safety and security in the alleys, 6) their sense of safety and security when approaching locals, 7) their sense of safety and security when walking through a crowd and 8) their sense of safety and security with their possessions. Most variables showed that tourists, with or without prior knowledge, felt safe and secure, which means that businesses would be positively affected (Mambre, 2016). However, cruise tourists who knew about Curaçao before being on the island were the majority that went beyond the main shopping area in Punda and that went into alleys. These were the factors that were partially associated with the cruise tourists’ sense of safety and security. This had a positive effect on business, taking into account the suggestion of George (2010), that if cruise tourists with prior knowledge of Curaçao were already comfortable enough to walk beyond Punda and walk through the alleys, they would be able to contribute to our economy. (George, 2010) Secondly, based on Mambre’s study, racial heritage was another factor that had a partial relationship with the cruise tourists’ sense of safety and security (Mambre, 2016). Most of the variables, however, showed that the racial heritage of the cruise tourist did not matter because he or she felt safe, however the variable that made a difference was the places that the cruise tourists ventured out to, and whether or not they went into the alleys. Of all the three different racial groupings (African, European and American), the cruise tourists of African descent were the ones that did not go beyond Punda and were the majority that did not go into the alleys. This could be based on several factors maybe they did not feel comfortable 20 Marketing For The Future to do so or maybe they had had bad experiences. Thus, cruise tourists of African descent might be hesitant to spend in our economy. Thirdly, age was mentioned as a factor that had a partial relationship. The age category 56> comprised the majority that went beyond Punda and into the alleys, so these were ABLE TO TAKE RISK the only variables that dictated the partial relationship. This behavior showed that they were able to take risks and that they might hold different perceptions of crime. Following George’s logic, they would be able to contribute more to our tourism. (George, 2010). Again, here most of the variables showed that no matter the age of the cruise tourist, he or she felt safe. Furthermore, the area of residence also had a relationship. Cruise tourists living in a big city were the majority that went into Punda’s main shopping area and into the alleys (Mambre, 2016). The fact that they were the majority in the main shopping area of Punda demonstrated that they most probably spent money in our economy. Lastly, the travel experience of cruise tourists also had a partial relation- ship with their sense of safety and security. Mambre demonstrated that cruise tourists who were in the category of “more experienced” were the majority that went in to Punda’s main shopping area and that went into the alleys (Mambre, 2016). Besides these variables, the category of “most experienced” was the majority that felt safe while walking in downtown. Thus there were three variables that showed a positive correlation with business: the majority of more experienced travelers were in the main shopping area and the most experienced ones felt safe walking in the downtown area, which was positive for tourism demand. According to Mambre’s study, there was no relationship between most of the variables in relation to each of the factors (Mambre, 2016). For instance, the age, area of residence, travel experience or whether the cruise tourist had or did not have prior knowledge of the island upon arrival did not matter because they felt safe and secure anyway. Only the factor of racial heritage played a significant role, since cruise tourists of African heritage did not go into the alleys or beyond Punda, and they would be cautious in terms of their expenditures. Mambre suggested that in the downtown area of Punda, more police surveillance was necessary, in the form of police officers on bikes, or “Politur” patrolling the downtown area. Additionally, the Government could make the abandoned buildings found in the area more appealing, through restoration, to give tourists a heightened sense of safety. And finally, the Curaçao Tourism Board should include and involve more stakeholders in order to improve Curaçao as a tourist destination (Mambre, 2016).