Link June 2018 Volume 27 Issue 3 - Page 29

issues Kevin was new to dancing, so they took some lessons before the big day. Their ‘best persons’ (there was no best man or bridesmaids at this ceremony) squared them up in opposite corners. Then they walked towards each other, “We can make assumptions about how inflexible people might be. But when you put it to them, you understand how resilient they are. We shouldn’t make these assumptions.” found each other and started dancing a rhumba. With vision impairment, “Being vision-impaired doesn’t Reflecting on the differences between you can’t move quickly across a wide mean that you are helpless. People Australia and South Africa, Francois space and in a rhumba both dancers’ sometimes think that if you can’t is grateful he can get around easily bodies are always in contact so it can imagine something, it’s not possible. in Melbourne as a vision-impaired be done well. Putting them in the space where person and that he has access to they have to experience blindness, adaptive technology that allows him they can start to question their to email, text and use computers. “Wow, this was absolutely the best day of both our lives,” they said. Francois was born blind and learned braille at school. Kevin lost assumptions,” Francois said. Kevin lectures at Deakin University The men have their beautiful dog guides and they said life could not be his sight in his mid-twenties. While in Human Rights and Workforce better! they were not particularly active in Diversity and he’s the former Chair of www.dialogueinthedark.com.au promoting same-sex marriage, both Vision Australia and well-known for of them live and breathe their belief in his volunteer work in the Asia Pacific * Link Disability Magazine published human rights and, especially, disability region of the World Blind Union. His an article by Carole Lander about rights. Francois is a business analyst work is all about normalising diversity Dialogue in the Dark in the August 2017 by profession, but he now proudly and helping people to become edition. Melbourne now has one of 133 works for Dialogue in the Dark* where comfortable with it. versions (world-wide) of this experiential he enjoys demystifying stereotypes about blindness. linkonline.com.au The newly-weds are now back in Melbourne and back at work. venue that allows sighted people to experience life in total darkness. issues 29