LeadingAge New York Adviser Fall 2015 Vol. 1 - Page 13

Monitoring Data... (Continued from page 11) disaster. Another area is within the dietary department, where managers make sure that quality is maintained without exceeding daily and monthly budget goals. From a clinical perspective, census tracking that is updated every 15 minutes has enabled Parker Jewish to offer patient care that is Initially the challenge with data collection was whittling appropriately staffed. “The ability to adjust staffing on a real-time basis has been a “game changer” for down data cubes to a smaller, more manageable the organization,” Rosenblut says. number. However, a second challenge has been getting Initially the challenge with data collection was whittling down data cubes to a smaller, more employees to understand and use data dashboards. manageable number. However, a second challenge has been getting employees to understand and use data dashboards. Parker Jewish leaders who have the data dashboards available in their offices are speaking about data regularly, and the organization will slowly begin to hold executives more accountable for decisions based on data. Going Forward Within the next year, Parker Jewish plans to add human resources-related information to its data dashboards. This would include information on turnover and open positions. As other long-term care organizations begin the process of electronic data collection and analysis, Rosenblut shares some advice from the Parker Jewish experience. 1. Start small. Plan to initially analyze less data, so leaders are not overwhelmed by the process and unable to effect real change. 2. Partner with technology leaders. Parker Jewish has collaborated with Custom Computers Specialists, a technology solutions provider that specializes in supporting long term care facilities. Custom was able to provide the depth and breadth of IT skills that Parker needed t