Lab Matters Summer 2019 - Page 41

APHL 2019 POSTER ABSTRACTS at US laboratories throughout the years. Recently due to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity Domestic Ebola Supplemental for Enhanced Laboratory Biosafety and Biosecurity Capacity Cooperative Agreement, Biosafety Officials (BSO) from public health laboratories (PHLs) and the clinical laboratory community have improved their laboratory biosafety and biosecurity practices to reduce the threat of LAIs. This poster will highlight recent LAIs due to a lack of laboratory biosafety and biosecurity procedures along with showcasing how laboratories across the US along with APHL have developed resources and trainings to reduce this risk. What would you like attendees to learn from this session or presentation? Attendees will learn about LAIs that occurred in the laboratory workspace that were a result due to lack of biosafety procedures. The poster will highlight the need for biosafety practices to be conducted at all times in the laboratory. Relevance and timeliness: The risk of a LAI is real, most clinical labs have not incorporated risk assessments and other tools to mitigate risk into routine processes in their labs. APHL in partnership with CDC has developed several tools to assist these labs with strengthening their biosafety practices to reduce these risks. Learning Objectives: What would you like attendees to learn from this session or presentation? The poster will provide attendees resources for biosafety and biosecurity trainings that they can utilize and distribute to the clinical laboratories within their jurisdictions at no cost. Relevance: There is a gap of fundamental biosafety and biosecurity practices within clinical laboratories across the United States. Staff in these labs lack specific training in biosafety and biosecurity practices, which some perceived as an impediment to productivity. PHL Biosafety Officers and APHL partners have addressed these gaps in the development of virtual trainings. Learning Objectives: • Attendees will gather information on how biosafety officers and APHL partners are engaging clinical labs in biosafety and biosecurity trainings. • Highlight biosafety and biosecurity trainings developed through APHL partners such as American Biological Safety Association and The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials • Highlight biosafety and biosecurity trainings developed through PHLs Presenter: Drew Fayram, State Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa, Coralville, IA, drew-fayram@uiowa.edu At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to: • Highlight LAIs that have occurred due to a lack of biosafety practices and procedures • Show the impact of work APHL and our patterns have accomplished since the CDC cooperative agreement to mitigate risks in the laboratory Presenter: Michael Perry, New York State Department of Health- Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY, michael.perry@health.ny.gov Biosafety Trainings: A Closer Look to Available Trainings Online M. Marsico 1 , D. Fayram 2 ; 1 Association of Public Health Laboratories, 2 State Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa In 2015, 64 state, local and territorial public health labs (PHLs) were part of the three-year, $21 million US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity Domestic Ebola Supplemental for Enhanced Laboratory Biosafety and Biosecurity Capacity Cooperative Agreement. These PHLs had to enhance and improve their internal laboratory biosafety and biosecurity practices but also work with their clinical laboratories in their jurisdiction to improve their practices and biosafety capacity as well. In order to strengthen biosafety and biosecurity practices in clinical laboratories, PHLs and APHL partners have developed numerous online trainings where participants can abccess these at any time from their own laboratories. These trainings are freely available for laboratorians to access on their respective websites. These trainings provided clinical laboratorians the necessary information to enhance and improve their biosafety and biosecurity practices. For instance, the State Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa provides training, courses and other resources to public and environmental health professionals throughout Iowa and across the nation. The State Hygienic Laboratory provides online trainings to help clinical laboratories improve knowledge and best practices of biosecurity along with trainings to detect potential biological threat agents. PublicHealthLabs @APHL APHL.org Emphasizing Biosafety Training in a Medical Laboratory Technology Program to Enhance Biosafety Knowledge and Capacity in the Future Workforce S. Cochran 1 , J. Elwood 1 , D. Fayram 1 , K. Friedley 2 ; 1 State Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa, 2 Kirkwood Community College Since 2015, biosafety professionals in public health laboratories across the US and its territories have worked with clinical diagnostic laboratories to enhance biosafety and biosecurity capacity. These efforts have utilized many approaches and achieved varying degrees of success. One universally recognized need is for formal biosafety training as an integrated component of academic curricula. The State Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa (SHL) and Kirkwood Community College (KCC) share a strong partnership and facilities conveniently located near one another on the University of Iowa Research Park. Recognizing an opportunity for a unique collaboration, these entities developed an introductory biosafety course as part of KCC’s first ever accredited Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) program. This course was first taught during the fall 2018 semester. The goal of this collaboration is to instill in students the didactic knowledge of biosafety theory and best practices before they start clinical laboratory experiences or their careers. The team began with the 1 credit, 1 semester undergraduate biosafety curriculum recently developed by ABSA International and modified it to better align with the goals of the Kirkwood MLT program and meet the unique demands of the clinical laboratory setting. Adjunct instructors included two microbiology staff from SHL who combined best practice information with accounts of their own work experiences. Guest lecturers for this course included the SHL Biosafety Officer and several members of the APHL Biosafety and Biosecurity Committee. To our knowledge, this is the first collaboration between a state public health laboratory and a community college-based MLT program that aims to enhance biosafety in clinical laboratories Summer 2019 LAB MATTERS 39